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I've been reading about custom events and looked at some examples. Perhaps I am misunderstanding what custom events are and how they are triggered and would appreciate some help.

Example Problem

To trigger an event when the background colour of a div changes from one colour to another.

Situation A) The colour changes as result of user activity detectable from within the script, eg by onclick, onmouseover, onkeypress then I would set up a listener for these events and respond accordingly. This I understand how to do.

Situation B) The colour changes as the result of user activity not detectable from within the script, eg a new theme applied to the page, then am I correct in thinking the following are necessary?

  1. I would need to create a custom event for colour change.
  2. Add a listener for the event to the appropriate DIV
  3. The listener would need to poll the DIV at intervals to check for colour changes

Really its step 3 I am not clear about. If you are not polling the DIV how does the event colour change trigger an event? In other words how does the script know that a colour change has taken place?

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what is “new theme being applied”? this is still custom code someone written, and that code may trigger the desired event. –  gryzzly Jan 11 '13 at 14:26
    
Using browser options a user can change font size, background colours etc, ie apply a new theme. As far as I know there are no native events within javascript to deal with these so I would need to create a custom event within my script. What I am trying to ask is how to you find out when a custom event takes place? That is in my example how does the colour change act as a trigger or do you just have to keep checking (using setTimeout for example) whether a colour change has taken place? –  jing3142 Jan 11 '13 at 14:42
    
Your own code must fire the custom event. The program you have written must decide when it is time to call .dispatchEvent (or .trigger, in jQuery). Custom events are just messages to event listeners. You decide when to send them; they don't happen on their own. Sometimes the only way to detect when it is time to fire an event (i.e., send a message to your event listeners) is by using polling. –  apsillers Jan 11 '13 at 14:43
    
.. and so it follows that if I want the program to decide to fire the custom event on the colour change I must use setTimeout with an appropriate function to keep checking the colour and fire the event when it changes. Thank you @apsillers I think I am clear now. –  jing3142 Jan 11 '13 at 14:58
    
@jing3142 Yes, I think you've got it; that is exactly correct. –  apsillers Jan 11 '13 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In JavaScript, a custom event is simply a message, broadcast to all event listeners, that says, "Attention everyone: event X just happened!" Any listener that cares about that event can then run some function.

However, your custom event still needs to be fired somehow. Custom events aren't fired unless, somewhere in your code, you call .dispatchEvent (or .trigger, in jQuery). Your program must decide when it is time to fire the event. If the browser doesn't natively fire an event that you can use as a cue for your own custom event, then often polling is the only way to know when to fire the event.

The bottom line here is events are just messages. It's up to you and the code you write to decide when to fire them.

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Custom events are not like DOM events, they don't fire because some interaction happened in the browser. They happen when the person who writes the code decides for them to happen. You have to explicitly trigger custom event when you need one.

For example, you might have function like

function updateBackground (element, color) {
  elmenet.css('background-color', color);
  // element has to be an object that has `trigger` function on its prototype
  // like jQuery wrapped element, for example
  element.trigger('updated-background', color);
}

Then every time this code is executed you'll have 'updated-background' fired in context of this element.

UPD.

Using browser options a user can change font size, background colours etc, ie apply a new theme. As far as I know there are no native events within javascript to deal with these so I would need to create a custom event within my script. What I am trying to ask is how to you find out when a custom event takes place?

You find out because you create them. You are correct (to my knowledge) that there are no DOM events fired when user changes font-size / default body background etc. You could poll for body and fire custom event when you detect a change, as you said.

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