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I'm looking at future load requirements & wondering why not use iframes for static content, directed off to servers dedicated to static-only content?

The static servers could be on the same or different physical system as the dynamic content servers.

That would be in lieu of having to configure a load balancer & static proxy server (like Varnish) in front of the dynamic server.

FWIW I did this back in the old frame days when all we had was a Pentium I @ 133 Mhz (before frames became evil or whatever)

edit: I gather that iframes can be unpleasant about resize & other page-level events if their content is over-engineered. IIRC this can be avoided, but the iframe won't inherit any style changes (CSS won't cascade into the iframe contents and/or cross-domain impedances).

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If you ever have to change the look and feel of your site, you won't want to deal with load balancing issues as a side effect.

You mention processing power. Today's processor's are on the order of 1000 times more powerful than a Pentium 133. I would really want to confirm that there was a processor bottle neck before trying this

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If I read you correctly, L&F issues would arise from divergent style sources. OTOH L&F issues can be reconciled as with any modular design otherwise. .. Processing power: Indeed, and a P133 was lucky to have 64 MB RAM. I'm anticipating either huge loads, or variable hardware implementations down the road, so I want to keep in mind having a malleable infrastructure. I see a great deal of performance hand-wringing about this problem (Varnish ...), wondering if the orthodoxy against iframes is (im)mutable. –  Bert Lee Jan 11 '13 at 16:42
    
P.S. I just tried to upvote your respo but I currently lack reputation ... LOL. –  Bert Lee Jan 11 '13 at 16:57

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