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I have a SQL query here that looks like this:

SELECT R.Extra3 AS 'Practice',
    SUM(DATEDIFF(s, R.Pickup, R.Hangup)) AS 'Seconds',
    COUNT(R.Extra3) AS 'Calls'
FROM Outbound.dbo.Results R
JOIN Outbound.dbo.Queue Q
    ON Q.QueueID = R.QueueID
    AND Q.Attempt = R.Attempt
WHERE R.CampaignId = 1
    AND DATEPART(m, R.Pickup) = DATEPART(m, DATEADD(m, -1, getdate()))
    AND DATEPART(y, R.Pickup) = DATEPART(y, DATEADD(m, -1, getdate()))
GROUP BY R.Extra3

I have to use this in a program and decided to go the LINQ route. So here is what I came up with:

IQueryable<PracticeSummary> query = db.Results
    .Join(
        db.Queues,
        r => new { Id = r.QueueID.Value, Attempt = r.Attempt.Value },
        q => new { Id = q.QueueID, Attempt = (byte)q.Attempt },
        (r, q) => r
    )
    .Where(
        r => r.CampaignID == 1
            && r.PickUp.Value.Month == lastMonth
            && r.PickUp.Value.Year == lastMonthYear
    )
    .GroupBy(g => g.Extra3)
    .Select(r => new PracticeSummary
    {
        Practice = r.Key,
        Calls = r.Count(),
        Seconds = (r.Sum(item => EntityFunctions.DiffSeconds(item.PickUp, item.HangUp).Value))
    });

My SQL query is giving me the correct result while my LINQ query is returning more than 10 times the rows and as a result, the sum and count are more.

I even looked at the TSQL that was generated. It looks like this:

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[GroupBy1].[K1] AS [Extra3], 
[GroupBy1].[A1] AS [C2], 
[GroupBy1].[A2] AS [C3]
FROM ( SELECT 
        [Filter1].[K1] AS [K1], 
        COUNT([Filter1].[A1]) AS [A1], 
        SUM([Filter1].[A2]) AS [A2]
        FROM ( SELECT 
                [Extent1].[Extra3] AS [K1], 
                1 AS [A1], 
                DATEDIFF (second, [Extent1].[PickUp], [Extent1].[HangUp]) AS [A2]
                FROM  [dbo].[Results] AS [Extent1]
                INNER JOIN [dbo].[Queue] AS [Extent2] ON ([Extent1].[QueueID] = [Extent2].[QueueID]) AND (([Extent1].[Attempt] =  CAST( [Extent2].[Attempt] AS tinyint)) OR (([Extent1].[Attempt] IS NULL) AND ( CAST( [Extent2].[Attempt] AS tinyint) IS NULL)))
                WHERE (1 = [Extent1].[CampaignID]) AND ((DATEPART (month, [Extent1].[PickUp])) = @p__linq__0) AND ((DATEPART (year, [Extent1].[PickUp])) = @p__linq__1)
        )  AS [Filter1]
        GROUP BY [K1]
)  AS [GroupBy1]

As far as I can tell it is pretty similar to what I have and want.

So my question is why are the results different? What is the difference between my SQL and LINQ queries? What am I missing?

Thanks in advance for your time and effort!

EDIT:

Here are the classes for Queue & Result:

public partial class Queue
{
    public long QueueID { get; set; }
    public long CampaignID { get; set; }
    public int Attempt { get; set; }
    public System.DateTime StartTime { get; set; }
    public System.DateTime EndTime { get; set; }
    public string Extra1 { get; set; }
    public string Extra2 { get; set; }
    public string Extra3 { get; set; }
}

public partial class Result
{
    public long ResultID { get; set; }
    public Nullable<long> QueueID { get; set; }
    public Nullable<long> CampaignID { get; set; }
    public Nullable<byte> Attempt { get; set; }
    public Nullable<System.DateTime> PickUp { get; set; }
    public Nullable<System.DateTime> HangUp { get; set; }
    public string Extra1 { get; set; }
    public string Extra2 { get; set; }
    public string Extra3 { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Do you have records in your Q and R tables that have the matching QueueID but Attempt is NULL? Also, could you please post your classes for Q and R? –  IronMan84 Jan 11 '13 at 15:18
    
Please check the updated question. I have posted the classes. Also there are no records where Attempt is NULL. –  Karthic Raghupathi Jan 11 '13 at 15:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are getting ten times the number of results, that indicates the issue is in the join. I would suggest building the query from the bottom up and testing the results to determine if there is an issue with the join.

Try this first:

IQueryable<PracticeSummary> query = db.Results
    .Join(
        db.Queues,
        r => new { Id = r.QueueID.Value, Attempt = r.Attempt.Value },
        q => new { Id = q.QueueID, Attempt = (byte)q.Attempt },
        (r, q) => new { ResultID = r.ResultID, QueueID = q.QueueID
    );

foreach (var result in query)
{
    // See what you have got
}

Maybe it would be easier even to do the where first:

IQueryable<PracticeSummary> query = db.Results
    .Where(
        r => r.CampaignID == 1
            && r.PickUp.Value.Month == lastMonth
            && r.PickUp.Value.Year == lastMonthYear
    )
    .Join(
        db.Queues,
        r => new { Id = r.QueueID.Value, Attempt = r.Attempt.Value },
        q => new { Id = q.QueueID, Attempt = (byte)q.Attempt },
        (r, q) => new { ResultID = r.ResultID, QueueID = q.QueueID
    );

foreach (var result in query)
{
    // See what you have got
}
share|improve this answer
    
Got it! My queries are not the same. The key is in my query criteria. My LINQ query is correct and SQL is wrong. I'm querying for the last months records. So in LINQ I got it right: && r.PickUp.Value.Month == lastMonth && r.PickUp.Value.Year == lastMonthYear But in my SQL query I had: AND DATEPART(m, R.Pickup) = DATEPART(m, DATEADD(m, -1, getdate())) AND DATEPART(y, R.Pickup) = DATEPART(y, DATEADD(m, -1, getdate())) For DATEPART y is day of year and yy means year. Yes it is my mistake. Your bottom up approach helped me so I'm marking yours as the answer. Thanks! –  Karthic Raghupathi Jan 11 '13 at 18:36

Is it possible that your Results.Attempt and Queue.Attempt values contain some nulls??

if so following statement will multiply all the rows with nulls in your results:

OR (([Results].[Attempt] IS NULL) AND ( CAST( [Queue].[Attempt] AS tinyint) IS NULL))
share|improve this answer
2  
There are no records which have NULL value for Attempt in both the Queue and Results table. –  Karthic Raghupathi Jan 11 '13 at 15:38
    
One other thing that it does differently from you query is it uses CAST([Queue].[Attempt] AS tinyint)) instead of just [Queue].[Attempt] but that will not affect anything if Attempt is int. –  Bulat Jan 11 '13 at 15:48

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