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To print from a line containing "hi" to a line containing "bye", I do:

awk '/hi/./bye/'

To print from a line containing "hi" to end of file, I do:

awk '/hi/,0'

How do I script to end printing at either of these end conditions?

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Edit: awk /hi/,/bye/ works, but only if the line containing the start token doesn't also contain the end token (which it does in my case), OR if the input file contains the end token on a later line. I should have mentioned this. ie. awk /hi/,/bye/ doesn't work for: 1\n2\nhi bye\n3 –  user1088084 Jan 11 '13 at 15:56
    
Don't do either of those as your code quickly gets unmanageable if you try to build on them. Just set and test a flag instead. –  Ed Morton Jan 11 '13 at 17:25
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In awk using a variable p as a flag:

$ cat file
start
line 2
hi
line 4
bye
end

$ awk '/hi/{p=1}{if (p) print}' file
hi
line 4
bye
end

$ awk '/hi/{p=1}{if (p) print}/bye/{p=0}' file
hi
line 4
bye

More concise:

$ awk '/hi/{p=1}p' file
hi
line 4
bye
end

$ awk '/hi/{p=1}p;/bye/{p=0}' file
hi
line 4
bye

I like sed for this however:

$ sed -n '/hi/,/bye/p' file
hi
line 4
bye

$ sed -n '/hi/,$p' file
hi
line 4
bye
end
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Thanks for sed usage. Forgot about that! –  user1088084 Jan 11 '13 at 15:52
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I try to re-phase your question:

I want to print a file from line containing "hi", till line containing "bye", if there is no "bye" in file, I print from "hi" till EOF. (with awk)

if my understanding was correct,in fact you have given yourself answer:

awk '/hi/,/bye/'  

will do the job.

let's test with awk '/5/,/0/'

kent$  seq 12 |awk '/5/,/0/'
5
6
7
8
9
10

kent$  seq 9 |awk '/5/,/0/'                                                                                                                                                 
5
6
7
8
9

in the 2nd command, there is no 0 in the "file", so it will just print from /5/ till the end.

Note that in the "found" case, you have to handle "exit", otherwise if there were lines containing "hi" after "bye", they would be printed as well.

I hope this is what you were asking.

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Didn't know you could just do /hi/,/bye/ in awk assumed it didn't work from the question, should have tried +1. –  sudo_O Jan 11 '13 at 15:52
    
You're right. What I realized in my actual usage is that my start token (if mapped to my example) was hi bye and I had no end token. In this case, awk /hi/,/bye/` only prints the start line. sudo_O's answer works for this case. I realized I didn't imply the generic problem in my question. –  user1088084 Jan 11 '13 at 15:55
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awk '/hi/{f=1} f; /bye/{f=0}' file

If you ever want to print either or both of the delimiter lines, just re-order those 3 conditions.

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