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I have a set of arrays, with each array (data[]) stored in a doubly linked list node ArrayNode. I start at some given index in an array, and I iterate to another index in another array (they may be the same array). I know for sure that my two nodes are linked, and that the first is "to the left" of the second.

struct ArrayNode
{
 ArrayNode* prev;
 ArrayNode* next;

 int data[16];
 unsigned int count;
};



void iterate(ArrayNode* startnode, unsigned int startposition, ArrayNode* endnode, unsigned int endposition)
{
 for (unsigned int index = startposition; index < startnode->count; ++index)
 {
  std::cout << startnode->data[index] << "\n"; //I'd do some processing here
 }

 for (ArrayNode* node = startnode->next; node != endnode; node = node->next)
 {
  for (unsigned int index = 0; index < node->count; ++index)
  {
   std::cout << node->data[index] << "\n"; //I'd do some processing here
  }
 }

 for (unsigned int index = 0; index < endposition; ++index)
 {
  std::cout << endnode->data[index] << "\n"; //I'd do some processing here
 }
}

The above code is flawed in a couple ways. First of all, if startnode == endnode, it will give the incorrect output. Second, having 3 loops is inefficient for maintenance and code size. It seems like it should be possible to have the middle nested loop handle all cases elegantly, but I'm not seeing how. Is it? If not, how should this be done?

I want to avoid making an iterator object for this if possible.

share|improve this question
    
Why arent you using a much more natural representation for your objects? e.g. std::deque stores data in a similar way as your ad hoc hackery does. Then you get iterators and all the goodness of high-level abstraction. And you really want some abstraction over iteration as your example clearly shows. –  pmr Jan 11 '13 at 15:31
    
Because I need to access the internals in ways that deque doesn't expose. I may eventually use deque or an extension of it, but it is easier to figure out "what I'm doing" with this extremely simple hand-rolled data structure. –  user173342 Jan 11 '13 at 15:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should work:

void iterate(ArrayNode* startnode, unsigned int startposition, ArrayNode* endnode, unsigned int endposition)
{
  ArrayNode* node = startnode;
  unisgned int pos = startposition;
  while (!(node == endnode && pos == endposition)) {
    process(node->data[pos]);
    ++pos;
    if (pos == node->count) {
      pos = 0;
      node = node->next;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Would something like this suit your needs ?

ArrayNode* curnode = startnode;
unsigned int curposition = startposition;
while ((curnode != endnode) || (curposition != endposition)) {
        std::cout << curnode->data[curposition] << std::endl;
        if (++curposition == curnode->count) {
                curnode = curnode->next;
                curposition = 0;
        }
}

Note the absence of error checks, which are left as an exercise for the reader.

share|improve this answer
1  
You want an || in the while condition. –  Angew Jan 11 '13 at 15:31
    
right you are. Fixed. –  Sander De Dycker Jan 11 '13 at 15:34

I think this will do what you want, but I'd argue that it's not much clearer, much shorter, any faster, or any easier to maintain. If it were me, I'd use the code you have in your original post and comment it clearly.

void iterate(ArrayNode* startnode, unsigned int startposition, ArrayNode* endnode, unsigned int endposition)
{
    int startindex = startposition;
    for (ArrayNode* node = startnode; node != NULL; node = node->next)
    {
        int endindex = ( node == endnode ) ? endposition : node->count;
        for (unsigned int index = startindex; index < endindex; ++index)
        {
            std::cout << node->data[index] << "\n"; //I'd do some processing here
        }
        startindex = 0;
        if ( node == endnode ) 
            break;
    }
}
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