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I have some sub queries which are of data type var. These are getting working on a data table. I would like to pass these into another method, how can i do that? Ex:

    var subquery1= from results in table.AsEnumerable()
               where //some condition
               select new
               {
                  column1=results.field1,
                  column2 = results.field2
                  etc.,
               }
     var subquery2= from results in table.AsEnumerable()
               where //different condition
               select new
               {
                  column1=results.field1,
                  column2 = results.field2
                  etc.,
               }

Now, I would like to define some method to pass these subquery1, subquery2 as variables. ex:

void updategrid(var queries)
          {
          //some logic
           }

And execute the method:

updategrid(subquery1);
updategrid(subquery2);

When i try to use var in the method when defining it is not liking it. Please help me in how to do that. Thanks.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Donal Fellows, Andrew Whitaker, Ansgar Wiechers, IronMan84 Mar 31 '13 at 18:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Your result is a sequence of anonymous objects. var Keyword is just saying to compiler "Hey, deduce arguments for me from usage". The process of deducing types from usage is called Type Inference. But you can't say to C# compiler to infer types of method arguments in method declaration. Moreover, in case of anonymous objects you cant specify their name. So you shouldn't pass them around outside and inside other methods. You can cast them to dynamic and then access their members via CallSite (compiler creates them when you access a member of dynamic object like myDynamic.Name) or you can cast anonymous object to object and access its properties via reflection, but all these methods are non C# idiomatic and really miss the point of anonymous objects. Instead of creating anonymous objects in query

select new
{
  //members selection
}

Create a custom type

public class Result
{
    //Members decalaration
}

And instantiate it as the result of query like in next example: (you can substitute var keyword instead of IEnumerable<Result> - compiled code will be the same)

IEnumerable<Result> subquery1 = from results in table.AsEnumerable()
                                where //some condition
                                select new Result
                                {
                                     //fill members here
                                }

Method will look like

void updategrid(IEnumerable<Result> queries)
{
    //some logic here with strongly typed sequence
}

Then you will call updategrid like simply updategrid(subquery1) and you will have all the beauty of statically typed sequence of your elements in the body of updategrid

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Thanks for immediate response. I have followed your approach and created a public class like above. But wihtin the LINQ query, it is throwing error saying 'the member is inaccessible due to its protection level. (it is throwing error where exactly //fill members here is) –  svs Jan 11 '13 at 15:41
    
make you class public and it's properties public –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 11 '13 at 15:41
    
that worked. Thanks. –  svs Jan 11 '13 at 16:22

Var is not a data type. It is short hand for "figure out what data type this actually is when you compile the app". You can figure out what the data type actually is and use that for your parameter or you could create a generic function that will work with any data type.

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void updategrid(var queries)

Is not valid C#.

var is syntactic sugar - the variable has a type, but you don't need to declare it if the compiler can statically determine what it should be.

With a parameter, the compiler doesn't have enough information to determine the type.

Similarly, you can't declare a variable with var without assignment:

var something;

You will need to ensure the types of subquery1, subquery2 and the parameter to updategrid are all the same.

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You can declare method with var type of argument. But you can write so:

static void updategrid(dynamic queries)
{
} 

var means take type from right-hand side and declare variable with this type from left-hand side and this is processed in compile-time. As you can seen using var as method argument type makes no sense.

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In C#, there is no 'var' type. 'var' is just a keyword that tells the compiler to 'analyse whatever comes next to find out the type'. This is done during compilation, not runtime.

The variables you speak of are actually typed as anonymous types that the compiler automatically generates during compilation. Such types, since they have no name, cannot be used to declare parameter types or return values.

You should either create explicit classes for this data, or in .Net4 or later use the Tuple<> generic type.

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Use Object or dynamic

void updategrid(object queries)

void updategrid(dynamic queries)

var -> static type that is determined by the right side of expression. Cannot be used as parameter/return type

object -> Base class for all .NET types.

dynamic -> The type is resolved at runtime. Hence compile time checks are not made, and intellisense is not available. It has performance cost also.

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object won't work.. what will he cast it to? –  Simon Whitehead Jan 11 '13 at 15:34
    
To access custom properties not available in System.Object, casting to concrete type is required. But yes anonymous type cannot be done away with just object. –  Tilak Jan 11 '13 at 15:37

You could probably use a dynamic reference, but I wouldn't go for that.

Instead, the better option is to create actual classes for those data types and pass them to the methods instead.

For example:

public class MyColumns
{
   public string column1 {get;set;}
   public string column1 {get;set;}
   //etc.
}

Which you can create like this:

var subquery1= from results in table.AsEnumerable()
               where //some condition
               select new MyColumns
               {
                  column1=results.field1,
                  column2 = results.field2
                  //etc.
               };

and have a function like this:

public void updategrid(IEnumerable<MyColumns> queries)
{
}
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