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My actual program is more sophisticated than this, but I've tried to simplify things.

So let's say I'm reading a file with a list of URLs. I want to download the HTML from each URL and process it. The processing may be a bit complex, so I'd like it to be done on a separate thread.

The basic problem is how to tell when all the processing is done. For example, if the user tries to close the program before all URLs are processed, I want to give him a message and not exit the program. Alternatively, I want to terminate the program (perhaps with a MsgBox("Done") message) as soon as all the URLs are processed.

I'd like my code to look something as follows (assuming I've got an outer loop reading the URLs and calling this routine)...

List<Task> TaskList = new List<Task>();

async void ProcessSingleUrl(string url) {  
var web = new HttpClient();  
    var WebPageContents = await web.GetStringAsync(url);  
    Task t = Task.Run(() => ProcessWebPage(WebPageContents);  
    TaskList.Add(t);
}

The above code should run very quickly (Async methods run pretty well instantly) and return to the caller almost immediately.

But at that point, I may well have no entries whatsoever in TaskList, since a task isn't defined until the GetStringAsync is completed, and none (or maybe just a few) may have finished by then. So

Task.WaitAll(TaskList.ToArray());

doesn't work the way I need it to.

If absolutely necessary, I could first read in all the URLs and know how many Tasks to expect, but I'm hoping for a more elegant solution.

I suppose I could increment a counter just before the await, but that feels a bit kludgy.

I assume I'm structuring things incorrectly, but I'm not sure how to reorganize things.

Note: I'm not wedded to Task.Run. Good ol' QueueWorkItem is a possibility, but I think it has pretty well the same problems.

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2 Answers 2

I assume I'm structuring things incorrectly, but I'm not sure how to reorganize things.

I think that is true. Here is a possible solution: Store the whole computation as a Task in your list, not just the second part:

async Task ProcessSingleUrlInner(string url) {  
    var web = new HttpClient();  
    var WebPageContents = await web.GetStringAsync(url);  
    Task t = Task.Run(() => ProcessWebPage(WebPageContents);  
    await t;
}

void ProcessSingleUrl(string url) {
var t = ProcessSingleUrlInner(url);
TaskList.Add(t);
}

Waiting on all tasks of this list will guarantee that everything is done. Probably, you need to adapt this idea to your exact needs.

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It seems to me that this doesn't work. –  Larry Smith Jan 11 '13 at 17:50
    
It seems to me that this doesn't work. First, did you mean "return t;" instead of "await t;"? (An "await" with nothing after it doesn't do much, right?) And if so, aren't we back to where we started? Or am I missing something (again!)? –  Larry Smith Jan 11 '13 at 17:56
    
@LarrySmith If you left out the trailing await the task returned by ProcessSingleUrlInner would complete before ProcessWebPage completes. Awaiting it "includes" ProcessWebPage into the function. It ensures that ProcessSingleUrlInner does not complete before ProcessWebPage is complete. And that is the key to this solution: You get a task that only completes when everything is done. That is what you want, right? –  usr Jan 11 '13 at 19:17

I'm assuming that you're getting the list of urls as an IEnumerable<string> or some such.

You can use LINQ to convert each url into a Task, and then await them all to complete:

async Task ProcessUrls(IEnumerable<string> urls)
{
  var tasks = urls.Select(async url =>
  {
    var web = new HttpClient();  
    var WebPageContents = await web.GetStringAsync(url);  
    await Task.Run(() => ProcessWebPage(WebPageContents);
  });
  await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

Note that if you use this solution and there are multiple different urls that have errors, then Task.WhenAll will only report one of those errors.

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