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I'm building a tree walker for an homogeneus AST (all nodes have same class), what's the correct way to evaluate an if statement?

My AST for if are like this: enter image description here

I would something that when parses an IF block, evaluates sequentially his CONDBLOCK children and if one of them is true, the tree walker doesn't evaluate the remaining.

More clearly, my tree walker is something like:

ifStat       : ^(IF { jump=false; } condition* defcond?) 
condition    : { if (jump) return retval; } ^(CONDBLOCK exp block) { jump=$exp.value; }
defcond      : ^(DEFAULT block)

My question is, if in the example $op=+ so the first CONDBLOCK must be executed, I don't want evaluate anything else, I want execute the first CODEBLOCK and go up in my AST tree to evaluate the block after if.

Now I've implemented that with a flag and a check in condition rule that returns if the flag was true (that means another block is already been executed).

But return retval; completely stops the execution, I want just go up without evaluate remaining conditions. How can I do that?

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I'm not sure what you're asking here. Assuming you know how to evaluate expressions, surely the code for this practically writes itself? –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 11 '13 at 16:16
    
I'm asking what's the antlr way to jump over the if subtree when an already true CONDBLOCK was found –  marka.thore Jan 11 '13 at 16:20
    
I've clarified my question with a snippet of my walker –  marka.thore Jan 11 '13 at 16:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Any kind of runtime evaluation from an AST that involves branching or jumps is probably going to get ugly. You may want to consider converting the AST into a series of more conventional operations and execute them in sequence. It's an extra step, but it will get you out of jams like this one and I think it's easier to verify and to debug than an AST evaluator.

With that out of the way, here is a way to skip evaluating subsequent condition and defcond rules. I'm sticking with the structure that you have, which means that evaluations have two distinct phases: a matching phase (exp) and an execution phase (block). This is only worth noting because the phases are handled in different parts of a subgraph and there is no natural means of jumping around, so they need to be tracked across the whole if statement.

Here's a simple class to manage tracking a single if evaluation:

class Evaluation {
    boolean matched = false;
    boolean done = false;
}

When matched is true and done is false, the next block gets executed. After execution, done is set to true. When matched and done are both true, no more blocks get executed for the remainder of the if statement.

Here are the tree parser rules to handle this:

ifStat       
@init { Evaluation eval = new Evaluation(); }
             : ^(IF condition[eval]* defcond[eval]?) 
             ;

condition [Evaluation eval]
             : ^(CONDBLOCK exp {if ($exp.value) eval.matched = true;} evalblock[eval])
             ;

defcond [Evaluation eval] 
             : ^(DEFAULT {eval.matched = true;} evalblock[eval]) //force a match
             ;

evalblock [Evaluation eval]     
             : {eval.matched && !eval.done}? //Only do this when a condition is matched but not yet executed
                block                //call the execution code
                {eval.done = true;}  //evaluation is complete.
             | ^(CODEBLOCK .*)  //read the code subgraph (nothing gets executed)                
             ;

Here are the grammars and the code I used to test this:

TreeEvaluator.g (combined grammar to produce an AST)

grammar TreeEvaluator;

options { 
    output = AST;
}

tokens { 
    CONDBLOCK;
    CODEBLOCK;
    DEFAULT;
}


compilationUnit : condition+ EOF;
condition   : cif elif* celse? -> ^(IF cif elif* celse?);
cif         : IF expr block -> ^(CONDBLOCK expr block);
elif        : ELIF expr block -> ^(CONDBLOCK expr block);
celse       : ELSE block -> ^(DEFAULT block); 
expr        : ID EQ^ ID;
block       : LCUR ID RCUR -> ^(CODEBLOCK ID);

IF  : 'if';
ELIF: 'elif';
ELSE: 'else';
LCUR: '{';
RCUR: '}';
EQ  : '==';
ID  : ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z')+;
WS  : (' '|'\t'|'\f'|'\r'|'\n')+ {skip();};

AstTreeEvaluatorParser.g (tree parser)

tree grammar AstTreeEvaluatorParser;

options { 
    output = AST;
    tokenVocab = TreeEvaluator;
    ASTLabelType = CommonTree;
}

@members { 
    private static final class Evaluation {
        boolean matched = false; 
        boolean done = false;
    }

    private java.util.HashMap<String, Integer> vars = new java.util.HashMap<String, Integer>();

    public void addVar(String name, int value){
        vars.put(name, value);
    }

}

compilationUnit : ifStat+;

ifStat       
@init { Evaluation eval = new Evaluation(); }
             : ^(IF condition[eval]* defcond[eval]?) 
             ;

condition [Evaluation eval]
             : ^(CONDBLOCK exp {if ($exp.value) eval.matched = true;} evalblock[eval])
             ;

defcond [Evaluation eval] 
             : ^(DEFAULT {eval.matched = true;} evalblock[eval]) //force a match
             ;

evalblock [Evaluation eval]     
             : {eval.matched && !eval.done}? //Only do this when a condition is matched but not finished 
                block                //call the execution code
                {eval.done = true;}  //evaluation is complete.
             | ^(CODEBLOCK .*)  //read the code node and continue without executing
             ;

block        : ^(CODEBLOCK ID) {System.out.println("Executed " + $ID.getText());};

exp returns [boolean value]
            : ^(EQ lhs=ID rhs=ID)
                {$value = vars.get($lhs.getText()) == vars.get($rhs.getText());}
            ;

TreeEvaluatorTest.java (test code)

public class TreeEvaluatorTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        CharStream input = new ANTLRStringStream("if a == b {b} elif a == c {c} elif a == d {d} else {e}");
        TreeEvaluatorLexer lexer = new TreeEvaluatorLexer(input);
        CommonTokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(lexer);

        TreeEvaluatorParser parser = new TreeEvaluatorParser(tokens);

        TreeEvaluatorParser.compilationUnit_return result = parser.compilationUnit();

        if (lexer.getNumberOfSyntaxErrors() > 0 || parser.getNumberOfSyntaxErrors() > 0){
            throw new Exception("Syntax Errors encountered!");
        }

        AstTreeEvaluatorParser tparser = new AstTreeEvaluatorParser(new CommonTreeNodeStream(result.getTree()));
        tparser.addVar("a", 0);
        tparser.addVar("b", 2);
        tparser.addVar("c", 3);
        tparser.addVar("d", 4);
        AstTreeEvaluatorParser.compilationUnit_return tresult = tparser.compilationUnit();

    }
}

The test code evaluates if a == b {b} elif a == c {c} elif a == d {d} else {e}. The id between the {}s is printed if it is evaluated. So if a == b is true, then "Executed b" will be printed.

Variable values are assigned by calling tparser.addVar(...). In this case, a doesn't equal any other variable, so block {e} is evaluated.

share|improve this answer
    
What I was looking for was the way to consume token without do nothing ( ^(CODEBLOCK .*)), so your solution works perfectly. What do you mean with "... converting the AST into a series of more conventional operations ...", I want to learn more about. Thank you –  marka.thore Jan 12 '13 at 10:56
1  
@SalvatoreD. I'm glad I could help. The "more conventional operations" would be the kinds of operations that a compiled program uses to modify a program stack, registers, and/or memory. The operations can be represented as a list, so jumping is just a matter of moving the operation index ahead by the distance of the jump (or to the position of a label). Everything is linear, so it's easier for the programmer to read and to debug than when working with a tree graph. There's more code involved overall, but I think the payoff is worth it as a language gets more complex. –  user1201210 Jan 13 '13 at 2:17
    
The DFA that predicts alternatives for rule evalBlock, can't see the parameter eval. I've tried to declare that parameter as a field, but something strange happens (a FailedPredicateException is raised), I think there is something wrong in that approach, could you help me? Thanks –  marka.thore Jan 21 '13 at 13:18
    
@SalvatoreD. I'm not sure why you're getting that error. I updated my answer to show the full grammars and test code that I used originally. Maybe this will help. If not, consider writing up a new question since the problem is probably not related to your original one. –  user1201210 Jan 22 '13 at 2:52

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