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This works fine

if ((a >= 40 && a <= 50) || (a >= 60 && a <= 80))
// do something

How do I do the reverse of it?

if ((a < 40 && a > 50) || (a < 60 && a > 80))
// do something

The code does not work as expected. I want something like if not (condition)

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How can a number be less than 40 AND greater than 50 at the same time? –  seth Sep 15 '09 at 16:34
    
"The code does not work as expected." -- What did you really expect when you're asking for a number that is both less than 40 and greater than 50 at the same time? –  Mark Rushakoff Sep 15 '09 at 16:35
    
might be working in a modulo space :P –  Zed Sep 15 '09 at 16:40
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7 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You might want to look at De Morgan's laws.

1. !((a >= 40 && a <= 50) || (a >= 60 && a <= 80))

2. (!(a >= 40 && a <= 50) && !(a >= 60 && a <= 80))

3. ((!(a >= 40) || !(a <= 50)) && (!(a >= 60) || !(a <= 80))

4. ((a < 40 || a > 50) && (a < 60 || a > 80))


or in other words: (a < 40 || (50 < a && a < 60) || 80 < a)
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+1. Several examples that all demonstrate a possible solution complete with a reference on where to get more information. –  Grant Wagner Sep 15 '09 at 16:38
    
Logically correct, but the result is hard to read and it inhibits short-circuit evaluation. –  system PAUSE Sep 15 '09 at 16:47
    
also I managed to combine two steps into one. now that's fixed –  Zed Sep 15 '09 at 16:58
    
Much better than my quick fix –  SeanJA Sep 15 '09 at 23:42
    
+1 for mentioning De Morgan's Law –  Babak Naffas Sep 25 '09 at 1:32
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if ((a < 40 || a > 50) && (a < 60 || a > 80))
// do something
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aha, what is that dudes name who has the law that you used named after him. i have been trying to remember –  mkoryak Sep 15 '09 at 16:34
    
@mkoryak see my answer ;) –  Zed Sep 15 '09 at 16:37
    
This is one of De Morgan's laws: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Morgan%27s_laws –  0xA3 Sep 15 '09 at 16:37
    
This is an accurate application of De Morgan, but the resulting expression is a bit obfuscated IMO. –  system PAUSE Sep 15 '09 at 16:43
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While I would recommend figuring out how to make it work properly (by rewriting it)

if (!((a >= 40 && a <= 50) || (a >= 60 && a <= 80)))

should work I believe.

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You need a "OR"

if ((a < 40 || a > 50) && (a < 60 || a > 80))

Or, a NOT

if (!((a >= 40 && a <= 50) || (a >= 60 && a <= 80)))
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You second example

if ((a < 40 && a > 50) || (a < 60 && a > 80))

doesn't make sense as a cannot be both less than 40 and greater than 50 (or less than 60 and greater than 80) at the same time.

Something like

if (!((a < 40 && a > 50) || (a < 60 && a > 80)))

or

if ((a < 40 || a > 50) && (a < 60 || a > 80))
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if (!((a >= 40 && a <= 50) || (a >= 60 && a <= 80)))
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Assuming that you want the equivalent of

if ( not ((a >= 40 && a <= 50) || (a >= 60 && a <= 80)) )

then, if you think about the original expression, it should be

if (a < 40 || (a > 50 && a < 60) || a > 80)

The first expression is allowing a to be a number from 40 to 50 or from 60 to 80. Negate that in English and you want a number less than 40 or between 50 and 60 or greater than 80.

De Morgan's Laws can get you an accurate answer, but I prefer code that you can read aloud and make sense of.

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