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I've got an ASP.NET MVC 3 project with a form with 5 text input boxes to allow the user to enter search criteria.

Currently, when the user tabs from one field to the next, I've got a $('.watched').blur(ajaxSearch); function that issues my ajaxSearch function and this works ok, sorta...

My issue is that the ajaxSearch gets called each an every time I either tab through the fields, or click on one of the values displayed in the .searchResults result div.

I've put my current search javascript at the end of the question.

I would like to store the values in the textboxes, and then check them for changes before issuing another ajax call.

Psuedocode idea

var oldvalues =  {}
function saveCurrentValues() {
    foreach( input box on the form ) {
       save the currentvalue of the input box into oldvalues['inputboxid']
    }
}

function isNewSearch() {
    foreach( input box on the form ) {
        if (oldvalues['inputbox.id'] !== input box value) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

I am unsure how to implement the foreach and the oldvalues assignment. Could some javascript guru point me in the right direction for this implementation. (I've put commented lines in the javascript below where I think this implementation should go to actually do the work.)

javascript

function displayResults(data) {
    $('.searchResults').html(data);
}

function ajaxSearch() {
    // if (isNewSearch() ) {
    //    saveCurrentValues();
          $('#selectedRecord').empty();
          var myForm = $('#searchForm');
          $.post(myForm.URL, myForm.serialize(), displayResults);
    //}
}

$(function () {
    $('.watched').blur(ajaxSearch);
    //saveCurrentValues();
});
share|improve this question
2  
Why don't you use change event ? –  WereWolf - The Alpha Jan 11 '13 at 16:20
4  
how about using the data-* fields and storing the "last known value" within the input, then check .val() against .data('lastval') on an ajax call? –  Brad Christie Jan 11 '13 at 16:21
    
@SheikhHeera I was thinking that the change event fired for every character change, I don't want to issue multiple ajax calls for an individual textbox's changes. –  scott-pascoe Jan 11 '13 at 16:23
    
or you could just create a property on the DOMElement itself. this.oldvalue = this.value; –  crush Jan 11 '13 at 16:23
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Instead of making your own functions. Can't you use this change event instead of blur event.

$('.watched').change(ajaxSearch);

Change event only occurs when the value of element (input, textarea) was changed and then blurred.

The change event is sent to an element when its value changes. This event is limited to elements, boxes and elements. For select boxes, checkboxes, and radio buttons, the event is fired immediately when the user makes a selection with the mouse, but for the other element types (input, textarea) , the event is deferred until the element loses focus.

Here is Documentation

share|improve this answer
    
well, i have also included documentation note also above, see third big paragraph. –  Muhammad Talha Akbar Jan 11 '13 at 16:29
    
Thanks, I had read the documentation multiple times, but having it in bold calls out what I was missing. –  scott-pascoe Jan 11 '13 at 16:30
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// Bind to the blur event (and change event)
// but only trigger it when a new value is present:
$('.watched').on('blur change',function(e){
  var $this = $(this),
      curValue = $this.val(),
      lastval = $this.data('last');
  // check if it's a new value
  if (lastVal != curVal){
    // store new value
    $this.data('last',curVal);
    // now call ajax
    ajaxSearch();
  }
});

Pseudo-code, but take advantage of being able to store the last known value that was queried against when you go to make a new query.

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is helpful. I was thinking of something like that, but was getting too complicated. Though, I have to admit, that that Aspiring Aqib's answer allowed me to accomplish what I needed this time. –  scott-pascoe Jan 11 '13 at 16:33
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