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I have a large matrix (thousands of rows and hundreds of lines) which I'd like to normalize column-wise between -1 and 1. This is the code I wrote:

normalize <- function(x) { 
    for(j in 1:length(x[1,])){
        print(j)
        min <- min(x[,j])
        max <- max(x[,j])
        for(i in 1:length(x[,j])){
            x[i,j] <- 2 * (x[i,j] - min)/( max - min) - 1
        }
    }
    return(x)
}

Unfortunately it waaaay to slow. I've seen this:

normalize <- function(x) { 
    x <- sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, min)) 
    sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, max), "/") 
}

It's fast but it normalizes between 0 and 1. Can you help me please modifying it for my purpose? I'm sorry but I'm at the beginning learning R

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1  
First write some tests so that you can be sure your slow code is giving the right answer. Then you can check all the "solutions" about to be splatted onto SO do what you want. Writing tests is fun! –  Spacedman Jan 11 '13 at 16:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about rescaling the matrix x at the end of your own function?

normalize <- function(x) { 
    x <- sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, min)) 
    x <- sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, max), "/") 
    2*x - 1
}
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Thank you.. that made it –  endamaco Jan 11 '13 at 16:50

Benchmarks:

normalize2 <- function(A) { 
  scale(A,center=TRUE,scale=apply(A,2,function(x) 0.5*(max(x)-min(x))))
}

normalize3 <- function(mat) { 
  apply(mat,2,function(x) {xmin <- min(x); 2*(x-xmin)/(max(x)-xmin)-1})
}

normalize4 <- function(x) { 
  aa <- colMeans(x)
  x <- sweep(x, 2, aa)           # retrive the mean from each column

  2* sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, function(y) max(y)-min(y)), "/") 
}


set.seed(42)
mat <- matrix(sample(1:10,1e5,TRUE),1e3)
erg2 <- normalize2(mat)
attributes(erg2) <- attributes(normalize3(mat))
all.equal(  
  erg2,  
  normalize3(mat),   
  normalize4(mat)
  )

[1] TRUE

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(normalize4(mat),normalize3(mat),normalize2(mat))

Unit: milliseconds
             expr      min       lq   median       uq      max
1 normalize2(mat) 4.846551 5.486845 5.597799 5.861976 30.46634
2 normalize3(mat) 4.191677 4.862655 4.980571 5.153438 28.94257
3 normalize4(mat) 4.960790 5.648666 5.766207 5.972404 30.08334

set.seed(42)
mat <- matrix(sample(1:10,1e4,TRUE),10)
microbenchmark(normalize4(mat),normalize3(mat),normalize2(mat))

Unit: milliseconds
             expr      min       lq   median       uq       max
1 normalize2(mat) 4.319131 4.445384 4.556756 4.821512  9.116263
2 normalize3(mat) 5.743305 5.927829 6.098392 6.454875 13.439526
3 normalize4(mat) 3.955712 4.102306 4.175394 4.402710  5.773221

The apply solution is slightly slower if the number of columns is small, but slightly faster if the number of columns is large. Overall, performance is of the same magnitude.

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1  
+1 for benchmarking effort. –  agstudy Jan 11 '13 at 17:42

This will rescale the matrix using the same method

normalize <- function(x) { 
  x <- sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, mean))           # retrive the mean from each column
  2* sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, function(y) max(y)-min(y)), "/") 
}

}

Edit

use colMeans as suggested in comments is faster of course

normalize <- function(x) { 
  aa <- colMeans(x)
  x <- sweep(x, 2, aa)           # retrive the mean from each column

  2* sweep(x, 2, apply(x, 2, function(y) max(y)-min(y)), "/") 
}
A <- matrix(1:24, ncol=3)

> normalize(A)
           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]
[1,] -1.0000000 -1.0000000 -1.0000000
[2,] -0.7142857 -0.7142857 -0.7142857
[3,] -0.4285714 -0.4285714 -0.4285714
[4,] -0.1428571 -0.1428571 -0.1428571
[5,]  0.1428571  0.1428571  0.1428571
[6,]  0.4285714  0.4285714  0.4285714
[7,]  0.7142857  0.7142857  0.7142857
[8,]  1.0000000  1.0000000  1.0000000

EDIT with the scale function of the base package

scale(A,center=TRUE,scale=apply(A,2,function(x) 0.5*(max(x)-min(x))))
           [,1]       [,2]       [,3]
[1,] -1.0000000 -1.0000000 -1.0000000
[2,] -0.7142857 -0.7142857 -0.7142857
[3,] -0.4285714 -0.4285714 -0.4285714
[4,] -0.1428571 -0.1428571 -0.1428571
[5,]  0.1428571  0.1428571  0.1428571
[6,]  0.4285714  0.4285714  0.4285714
[7,]  0.7142857  0.7142857  0.7142857
[8,]  1.0000000  1.0000000  1.0000000
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colMeans() will be quicker than the first apply() call. –  Gavin Simpson Jan 11 '13 at 16:46
    
@GavinSimpson yes! you're right! I am searching how this is done in the scales packges fo example. –  agstudy Jan 11 '13 at 16:47
    
@GavinSimpson I think the best solution is with the scales package :) –  agstudy Jan 11 '13 at 17:06
    
Can't you do this with base scale()? –  Gavin Simpson Jan 11 '13 at 17:09
    
@GavinSimpson I update my answer. –  agstudy Jan 11 '13 at 17:11

How about just:

x[,1] <- (x[,1]-mean(x[,1]))/(max(x[,1])-min(x[,1]))

Most basic functions in R are vectorized, so there's no need to include a for loop in your code. This snippet will scale all of column 1 (you can also use the function scale(), although it doesn't have an option for min/max values).

To do an entire dataset, you can do something like this:

Scale <- function(y) y <- (y-mean(y))/(max(y)-min(y))
DataFrame.Scaled <- apply(DataFrame, 2, Scale)

Edit: It's also worth pointing out that you don't want to name a value after a function. When you do min <- min(x), it will lead to some confusion to R the next time you ask for min.

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1  
Re you edit: generally good advice, but it won't cause a problem in this case; min(foo) will only ever match an object min that is a function. –  Gavin Simpson Jan 11 '13 at 16:48

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