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Let's say we have a boxed double variable, foo and we want to multiply its value by 2 and store it in another boxed double variable , bar. From the following approaches,

Approach One:

Double bar = foo * 2;

and,

Approach Two:

Double bar = Double.valueOf(foo.doubleValue() * 2);

which one is more preferable considering efficiency, readability, and etc.? Or is the difference so trivial that these approaches are practically equivalent?

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3  
from readibility you can answer the question for yourself, from efficiency, that i asume depends on the implementation of the VM –  AlexWien Jan 11 '13 at 16:33
    
The two should be equivalent, as autoboxing is compiled into a call to valueOf –  Ian Roberts Jan 11 '13 at 16:33
1  
@IanRoberts: Although often claimed, that is actually not required. The JLS only specifies that a primitive double p which is not NaN is converted "into a reference r of class and type Double, such that r.doubleValue() evaluates to p". The compiler may just as well use e.g. "new Double(p)" instead of "Double.valueOf(p)" and still adhere to the JLS. –  jarnbjo Jan 11 '13 at 16:43
    
@jarnbjo true in principle, but not in practice. –  Ian Roberts Jan 11 '13 at 16:49
2  
@IanRoberts: So if mishadoff's car is black, all cars are black? –  jarnbjo Jan 11 '13 at 16:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First one. It has better readability and keep all boxing/unboxing operations behind the scene.

Do not think about efficiency of such simple operation as multiplying by 2.

...or long answer

Have two methods:

void method1() {
    Double foo = 1.0;
    Double bar = foo * 2;
}

void method2() {
    Double foo = 1.0;
    Double bar = Double.valueOf(foo.doubleValue() * 2);
}

Compile with javac and look bytecode instructions with javap

void method1();
   Code:
      0: dconst_1
      1: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Double.valueOf:(D)Ljava/lang/Double;
      4: astore_1
      5: aload_1
      6: invokevirtual #3                  // Method java/lang/Double.doubleValue:()D
      9: ldc2_w        #4                  // double 2.0d
     12: dmul
     13: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Double.valueOf:(D)Ljava/lang/Double;
     16: astore_2
     17: return

 void method2();
   Code:
      0: dconst_1
      1: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Double.valueOf:(D)Ljava/lang/Double;
      4: astore_1
      5: aload_1
      6: invokevirtual #3                  // Method java/lang/Double.doubleValue:()D
      9: ldc2_w        #4                  // double 2.0d
     12: dmul
     13: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/Double.valueOf:(D)Ljava/lang/Double;
     16: astore_2
     17: return

Can you spot the difference?

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1  
As I pointed out in my comment to the question, the boxing conversion is implementation specific. If you don't see a difference in the output of your compiler, does not mean that my compiler does the same. –  jarnbjo Jan 11 '13 at 16:51
    
@jarnbjo agreed –  mishadoff Jan 12 '13 at 14:01
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Approach one is better.

  • It can be read by humans
  • All else being equal, fewer characters is better than more characters
  • The compiler will probably remove any performance difference.
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Couldn't agree more with points 1 and 3. These are probably the first things that should pop into your head before undertaking any optimisation. –  davewatts Jan 11 '13 at 16:39
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I think that no matter how you try to optimize it, java will make this version Double bar = foo * 2; at least as optimized as your solution. Trying to gain performance like that is usually fruitless.

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I know this type of micro-optimization is fruitless..I'm just asking out of curiosity! –  mre Jan 11 '13 at 16:36
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