Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been working on a web crawling .NET app in my free time, and one of the features of this app that I wanted to included was a pause button to pause a specific thread.

I'm relatively new to multi-threading and I haven't been able to figure out a way to pause a thread indefinitely that is currently supported. I can't remember the exact class/method, but I know there is a way to do this but it has been flagged as obsolete by the .NET framework.

Is there any good general purpose way to indefinitely pause a worker thread in C# .NET.

I haven't had a lot of time lately to work on this app and the last time I touched it was in the .NET 2.0 framework. I'm open to any new features (if any) that exist in the .NET 3.5 framework, but I'd like to know of solution that also works in the 2.0 framework since that's what I use at work and it would be good to know just in case.

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 72 down vote accepted

Never, ever use Thread.Suspend. The major problem with it is that 99% of the time you can't know what that thread is doing when you suspend it. If that thread holds a lock, you make it easier to get into a deadlock situation, etc. Keep in mind that code you are calling may be acquiring/releasing locks behind the scenes. Win32 has a similar API: SuspendThread and ResumeThread. The following docs for SuspendThread give a nice summary of the dangers of the API:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms686345(VS.85).aspx

This function is primarily designed for use by debuggers. It is not intended to be used for thread synchronization. Calling SuspendThread on a thread that owns a synchronization object, such as a mutex or critical section, can lead to a deadlock if the calling thread tries to obtain a synchronization object owned by a suspended thread. To avoid this situation, a thread within an application that is not a debugger should signal the other thread to suspend itself. The target thread must be designed to watch for this signal and respond appropriately.

The proper way to suspend a thread indefinitely is to use a ManualResetEvent. The thread is most likely looping, performing some work. The easiest way to suspend the thread is to have the thread "check" the event each iteration, like so:

while (true)
{
    _suspendEvent.WaitOne(Timeout.Infinite);

    // Do some work...
}

You specify an infinite timeout so when the event is not signaled, the thread will block indefinitely, until the event is signaled at which point the thread will resume where it left off.

You would create the event like so:

ManualResetEvent _suspendEvent = new ManualResetEvent(true);

The true parameter tells the event to start out in the signaled state.

When you want to pause the thread, you do the following:

_suspendEvent.Reset();

And to resume the thread:

_suspendEvent.Set();

You can use a similar mechanism to signal the thread to exit and wait on both events, detecting which event was signaled.

Just for fun I'll provide a complete example:

public class Worker
{
    ManualResetEvent _shutdownEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    ManualResetEVent _pauseEvent = new ManualResetEvent(true);
    Thread _thread;

    public Worker() { }

    public void Start()
    {
        _thread = new Thread(DoWork);
        _thread.Start();
    }

    public void Pause()
    {
        _pauseEvent.Reset();
    }

    public void Resume()
    {
        _pauseEvent.Set();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        // Signal the shutdown event
        _shutdownEvent.Set();

        // Make sure to resume any paused threads
        _pauseEvent.Set();

        // Wait for the thread to exit
        _thread.Join();
    }

    public void DoWork()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            _pauseEvent.WaitOne(Timeout.Infinite);

            if (_shutdownEvent.WaitOne(0))
                break;

            // Do the work..
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The Threading in C# ebook summarises Thread.Suspend and Thread.Resume thusly:

The deprecated Suspend and Resume methods have two modes – dangerous and useless!

The book recommends using a synchronization construct such as an AutoResetEvent or Monitor.Wait to perform thread suspending and resuming.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll have to go and read that ebook. I've never had problems with Suspend/Resume myself. –  Phil Wright Sep 27 '08 at 3:02

I just implemented a LoopingThread class which loops an action passed to the constructor. It is based on Brannon's post. I've put some other stuff into that like WaitForPause(), WaitForStop(), and a TimeBetween property, that indicates the time that should be waited before next looping.

I also decided to change the while-loop to an do-while-loop. This will give us a deterministic behavior for a successive Start() and Pause(). With deterministic I mean, that the action is executed at least once after a Start() command. In Brannon's implementation this might not be the case.

I omitted some things for the root of the matter. Things like "check if the thread was already started", or the IDisposable pattern.

public class LoopingThread
{
  private readonly Action _loopedAction;
  private readonly AutoResetEvent _pauseEvent;
  private readonly AutoResetEvent _resumeEvent;
  private readonly AutoResetEvent _stopEvent;
  private readonly AutoResetEvent _waitEvent;

  private readonly Thread _thread;

  public LoopingThread (Action loopedAction)
  {
    _loopedAction = loopedAction;
    _thread = new Thread (Loop);
    _pauseEvent = new AutoResetEvent (false);
    _resumeEvent = new AutoResetEvent (false);
    _stopEvent = new AutoResetEvent (false);
    _waitEvent = new AutoResetEvent (false);
  }

  public void Start ()
  {
    _thread.Start();
  }

  public void Pause (int timeout = 0)
  {
    _pauseEvent.Set();
    _waitEvent.WaitOne (timeout);
  }

  public void Resume ()
  {
    _resumeEvent.Set ();
  }

  public void Stop (int timeout = 0)
  {
    _stopEvent.Set();
    _resumeEvent.Set();
    _thread.Join (timeout);
  }

  public void WaitForPause ()
  {
    Pause (Timeout.Infinite);
  }

  public void WaitForStop ()
  {
    Stop (Timeout.Infinite);
  }

  public int PauseBetween { get; set; }

  private void Loop ()
  {
    do
    {
      _loopedAction ();

      if (_pauseEvent.WaitOne (PauseBetween))
      {
        _waitEvent.Set ();
        _resumeEvent.WaitOne (Timeout.Infinite);
      }
    } while (!_stopEvent.WaitOne (0));
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Beside suggestions above, I'd like to add one tip. In some cases, use BackgroundWorker can simplify your code (especially when you use anonymous method to define DoWork and other events of it).

share|improve this answer

In line with what the others said - don't do it. What you really want to do is to "pause work", and let your threads roam free. Can you give us some more details about the thread(s) you want to suspend? If you didn't start the thread, you definitely shouldn't even consider suspending it - its not yours. If it is your thread, then I suggest instead of suspending it, you just have it sit, waiting for more work to do. Brannon has some excellent suggestions for this option in his response. Alternatively, just let it end; and spin up a new one when you need it.

share|improve this answer

The Suspend() and Resume() may be depricated, however they are in no way useless. If, for example, you have a thread doing a lengthy work altering data, and the user wishes to stop it, he clicks on a button. Of course, you need to ask for verification, but, at the same time you do not want that thread to continue altering data, if the user decides that he really wants to abort. Suspending the Thread while waiting for the user to click that Yes or No button at the confirmation dialog is the only way to prevent it from altering the data, before you signal the designated abort event that will allow it to stop. Events may be nice for simple threads having one loop, but complicated threads with complex processing is another issue. Certainly, Suspend() must never be used for syncronising, since its usefulness is not for this function.

Just my opinion.

share|improve this answer

Sadly this WaitOne-Loop created too much CPU load when I tried to replace a Console.ReadLine() with something better. So I ended up using Thread.Sleep(Timeout.Infinite). Maybe there are occasions when this is sufficient and doesn't cause any trouble.

See Is Thread.Sleep(Timeout.Infinite); more efficient than while(true){}?

share|improve this answer
2  
what are you answering for? –  tod yesterday

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.