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Short description: I am using OO Javascript with the function declaration, new keyword, and prototype approach (example below). I need a way to reference the "self" object within each method of the object. "this" seems to only work if I am calling the method directly, otherwise "this" seems to refer to whatever called the method instead.

More details: Here is a simplified version of my object.

function Peer(id) {
    this.id = id;
    this.pc = new RTCPeerConnection(SERVER);

    this.pc.onevent1 = this.onEvent1;
    this.pc.onevent2 = this.onEvent2;
}

Peer.prototype.doSomething = function() {
    // create offer takes one param, a callback function
    this.pc.createOffer(this.myCallback);
};

Peer.prototype.onEvent1 = function(evt) {
    // here this refers to the RTCPeerConnection object, so this doesn't work
    this.initSomething(evt.data);    
};

Peer.prototype.myCallback = function(data) {
    // here this refers to the window object, so this doesn't work
    this.setSomething = data;
};

Peer.prototype.initSomething = function(data) {
    // use data
};

And here is a sample use of it.

var peer = new Peer(1);
peer.doSomething();
// eventually something triggers event1

I tried to simplify the code as much as possible and explain the problem in comments. I created a workaround for the first scenario (calling this.myCallback) by creating a local copy of this and making the callback param an anonymous function that calls the function I need using my local copy of this. But the second scenario is more troublesome (an event firing).

I was curious if there is a different model for Object Oriented programming in which every method always has a proper reference to the parent object, regardless of how the method was invoked? Or if there is a different way to create an object as a property of a custom object and bind its events to the custom object's method? Sorry if this is confusing language! Note that my question has nothing to do with RTCPeerConnection, that just happened to be the project I'm working on currently.

I found this article: http://www.alistapart.com/articles/getoutbindingsituations but I wasn't totally sure how to use this information?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I was curious if there is a different model for Object Oriented programming in which every method always has a proper reference to the parent object, regardless of how the method was invoked?

Yes, there is: it's called Function.bind.

function Peer(id) {
    this.id = id;
    this.pc = new RTCPeerConnection(SERVER);

    this.pc.onevent1 = this.onEvent1.bind(this);
    this.pc.onevent2 = this.onEvent2.bind(this);
}

Likewise, for myCallback's this to always reference the Peer instance:

Peer.prototype.doSomething = function() {
    // create offer takes one param, a callback function
    this.pc.createOffer(this.myCallback.bind(this));
};
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Yes, thank you! For some reason I was only able to find the answer on here from another question after submitting (it showed up on the side, but not in "possibly related questions"). Sorry for the already answered question, but thank you for the answer. –  2bsharpdev Jan 11 '13 at 16:41

A method is just a function that's defined as a property on a prototype. It doesn't have any particular object context by itself and this is for a reason because there can be an infinite number of objects of a given type so the method works when given the context of a particular object.

In javascript (and in other OO languages too), that object context is provided by the caller. The classic way of doing so is where you call the method on a particular object:

obj.method();

But, you can also cause the this pointer to be set to something else by using .apply() or .call() or .bind(). You can read about all of them on MDN. .bind() isn't supported on some older browsers so you need to either use a shim or use a different solution (I use the one mentioned below).

So, the caller has to take responsibility for making sure the this ptr is set appropriately. That's how javascript works.

Another design pattern work-around when trying to pass a method call as a callback is like this:

var self = this;
callMeWhenDone(function() {
    self.myMethod();
});

Here, you save the this ptr in a local variable and use it to invoke a method from an anonymous callback because the this pointer in the callback will be set to something else.

Note: Internally, .bind() is just doing something similar to this workaround.

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