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I'm trying to optimize the performance on a VNC-type app I'm writing, and I'm having a bit of difficulty getting it truly optimized.

Given two bitmaps, I'd like to return a third bitmap, of the smallest possible size, which fully contains the differences between the bitmaps.

I am able to return a bitmap with the same size as my Bitmap A / Bitmap B, where the differences have color, and the rest is transparent, but this doesn't save me any actual data space, and doesn't actually optimize anything (Unless Bitmaps do something special with completely transparent pixels, but I feel as though they do not.)

Anyway, here's what I hve now, and I could potentially keep track of the pointer where the first change is found, and then keep track of the pointer where the last change is found, but how could I convert these pointers into a rectangle? And how could I crop my full-size difference bitmap in to that rectangle?

Here's the code I'm using so far:

var a = previous.Screen;
var b = next.Screen;
Bitmap output = new Bitmap(
Math.Max(a.Width, b.Width),
Math.Max(a.Height, b.Height),
PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);

Rectangle recta = new Rectangle(Point.Empty, a.Size);
Rectangle rectb = new Rectangle(Point.Empty, b.Size);
Rectangle rectOutput = new Rectangle(Point.Empty, output.Size);

BitmapData aData = a.LockBits(recta, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
BitmapData bData = b.LockBits(rectb, ImageLockMode.ReadOnly, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);
BitmapData outputData = output.LockBits(rectOutput, ImageLockMode.ReadWrite, PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);

try
{
    unsafe
    {
      byte* aPtr = (byte*) aData.Scan0;
      byte* bPtr = (byte*) bData.Scan0;
      byte* outputPtr = (byte*) outputData.Scan0;

      int h = Math.Min(a.Height, b.Height);
      int w = Math.Min(a.Width, b.Width);

      for (int y = 0; y < h; y++)
      {
        aPtr = (byte*) aData.Scan0;
        bPtr = (byte*) bData.Scan0;
        outputPtr = (byte*) outputData.Scan0;

        aPtr += y*aData.Stride;
        bPtr += y*bData.Stride;
        outputPtr += y*outputData.Stride;

         for (int x = 0; x < w; x++)
         {
           bool bl = false;
           //the three color channels
           for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++)
           {
             if (*aPtr != *bPtr)
             {
               bl = true;
             }

             *outputPtr = (byte) *bPtr;

             outputPtr++;
             aPtr++;
             bPtr++;
          }

          //alpha, when one or mre color channels are different
          if (bl)
           *outputPtr = (byte) ((*aPtr + *bPtr)/2);

          outputPtr++;
          aPtr++;
          bPtr++;
         }
      }
   }

 }
 catch
 {
    if (output != null)
    {
      output.UnlockBits(outputData);
      output.Dispose();
      output = null;
    }
 }
 finally
 {
     a.UnlockBits(aData);
     b.UnlockBits(bData);

     if (output != null)
       output.UnlockBits(outputData);
 }
share|improve this question
    
Is compression allowed? You could just send it over in a different format than bitmap. Also I think transparency just adds data. You could at least set it to 24-bit images so save a byte per pixel? Other options are to create a 8-bit palette, or use 16 bit color, PNG format maybe.. I'm not sure what your requirements are.. –  Alan Jan 11 '13 at 17:06
    
Compression could be allowed, the result needs to make it's way into a PictureBox on the other end. That's all. Wouldn't a 24-bit image lose the transparency? –  DTI-Matt Jan 11 '13 at 17:10
    
Yeah it sure would, but that would only really matter if you were trying to overlay that picture on top of something else later. What type of changes take place, by the way? Are they vector based changes like "draw a line" or are they arbitrary? If you could represent the changes as instructions that is the most efficient way probably. –  Alan Jan 11 '13 at 17:12
    
Well, it's a desktop sharing app. So it could be the changes that took place on the desktop between the time when the last image was taken (A window moved, or text was highlighted, etc.) But it's more than likely that many parts of these two images would stay the same at any given time, so I believe that a difference algorithm such as this one, if I could figure out the finer points, would help speed up the transfer. –  DTI-Matt Jan 11 '13 at 17:16
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