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I'm trying to make a very simple calculator in python. I've made a working one before using only functions, but adding classes is proving to be hard.

def askuser():
    global Question, x, y

    Question = input("""Enter a word: ("Add", "Subtract", "Multiply", "Divise")""")
    x = int(input("Enter first number: "))
    y = int(input("Enter second number: "))

class calculating:

    def __init__(self, x, y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y

    def add(self):
        return self.x + self.y

    def subtract(self):
        return self.x - self.y

    def multiplication(self):
        return self.x * self.y

    def division(self):
        return self.x / self.y

math = calculating

def calc():

    if Question == "Add":
        t = math.add
        print(t)

    elif Question == "Subtract":
        t = math.subtract
        print(t)

    elif Question == "Multiply":
        t = math.multiplication
        print(t)

    elif Question == "Division":
        t = math.division
        print(t)

def final():
    input("Press any key to exit:" )


def main():

    askuser()
    calc()
    final()

main()

Code runs fine but it gives me an "error" instead of outputting a calculation:

   Enter a word: ("Add", "Subtract", "Multiply", "Divise")Add

   Enter first number: 5

   Enter second number: 5

   function add at 0x02E4EC90

   Press any key to exit:

Why would that be? Any help would be great, thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are printing the function itself, not the result of calling it. Try:

def calc():

if Question == "Add":
    t = math.add

elif Question == "Subtract":
    t = math.subtract

elif Question == "Multiply":
    t = math.multiplication

elif Question == "Division":
    t = math.division

print t()

Or cleaner but more advanced:

class UserInputCalculator(object):

    operations = ["Add", "Subtract", "Multiply", "Divide"]

    def __init__(self):
        self.x = None
        self.y = None
        self.operation = None

    def run(self):
        self.prompt_for_operation()
        self.prompt_for_x()
        self.prompt_for_y()
        if self.operation == 'Add':
            return self.add()
        elif self.operation == 'Subtract':
            return self.subtract()
        elif self.operation == 'Multiply':
            return self.multiply()
        elif self.operation = 'Divide':
            return self.divide()
        else:
            raise ValueError('Unknown operation %s.' % operation)

    def prompt_for_operation(self):
        self.operation = input("Enter an operation: (%s)" % ', '.join(UserInputCalculator.operations))
        if self.operation not in UserInputCalculator.operations:
            raise ValueError('%s not a valid operation.' % self.operation)
        return self.operation

    def prompt_for_x(self):
        try:
            self.x = int(input("Enter first number: "))
        except:
            raise ValueError('Invalid value.')
        return self.x

    def prompt_for_y(self):
        try:
            self.y = int(input("Enter second number: "))
        except:
            raise ValueError('Invalid value.')
        return self.y

    def add(self):
        return self.x + self.y

    def subtract(self):
        return self.x - self.y

    def multiply(self):
        return self.x * self.y

    def divide(self):
        return self.x / self.y

calculator = UserInputCalculator()
print calculator.run()
input("Press any key to exit:" )
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. Your code doesn't work for some reason, it returns "NameError: global name 'operation' is not defined". I however rewrote my code to something like yours and it finally works! Cheers. –  vivi Jan 11 '13 at 19:02
    
Oops, yup, couple places needed self references... –  Silas Ray Jan 11 '13 at 19:08

the line:

t = math.multiplication

assigns the function object math.multiplication to t, which you then print with the next line. You need to add () to cause the function to actually execute:

t = math.multiplication()
share|improve this answer

The other two answers are correct in saying that what you're actually doing here is printing the function itself, not the result of calling it. I think you should reconsider the structure of this program, though, and ask yourself why you're using classes here. Generally speaking, a class should be something that has a state, i.e., one or more variables associated with each instance. This requires instantiating the class; your code, however, contains no instantiation (even though you defined an __init__ function); the line math = calculating is simply turning the variable math into a reference to the class calculating (not an instance of the class). Instead of class variables, you're using global variables, which can be problematic if you later want to import this module as part of a larger program (and really, global variables are generally just not a great idea most of the time).

Instead of this structure, then, I recommend thinking of functions as something that take a particular set of variables and return some other set of variables. This is not the only way to think of functions, but in this simple calculator example, it's probably the best way.

Let's look from the top down. Your main function might look something like this:

def main():
    (q,x,y) = askuser()
    ans = math[q](x,y)
    final(ans)

Notice that what I'm doing here is passing the result from each function to the next function. Also note that I now have a different syntax for using math; I'm going to use a dictionary of functions instead of a class of functions.

So let's look at how to implement the functions called by main. First, askuser will be identical to the original version in your code, with the exception that it will not contain the global declaration.

Second, math will be a dictionary, defined as follows:

def add(x,y):
    return x + y

def subtract(x,y):
    return x - y

def multiply(x,y):
    return x * y

def divide(x,y):
    return x / y

math = {"Add" : add,
        "Subtract" : subtract,
        "Multiply" : multiply,
        "Divide" : divide}

Finally, final should actually print the answer:

def final(ans):
    print ans
    input("Press any key to exit:" )

This is generally much cleaner than your solution. If you want to learn how to use classes well, though, it doesn't do much for you. So think about what exactly you want the state of your class to be, then implement your code that way. For instance, you might add a class calculator in this way:

class calculator:
    def compute(x,y):
        print "No operation defined!"

    def __init__(self,operation):
        if operation in math:
            self.compute = math[operation]
        else:
            print "%s is not a valid operation!"%operation

main would then look like this:

def main():
    (q,x,y) = askuser()
    mycalc = calculator(q)
    ans = mycalc(x,y)
    final(ans)
share|improve this answer
1  
Members of a class are stored in a dictionary internally, so all putting functions in a dictionary does is provide a poor man's class-like construct, except with a more obtuse interface and less power and useful tools around it. Some times dropping functions in a dictionary is a better solution, but it's not the thing you should be teaching an intro programmer to do. Do functional programming or do object oriented programming, but don't shoehorn pseudo-oo behavior in to functional programming constructs just because you can. –  Silas Ray Jan 11 '13 at 18:26
    
The asker is using the class as a container for multiple functions. They're not using it in an oo manner, so the extra power and functionality of true classes is not doing them any good. It doesn't make sense to hand-write switch-statement-like logic for accessing (static) class members instead of just using an actual built-in container type. –  Kyle Strand Jan 11 '13 at 19:40
    
It does if you are trying to learn basics of classes. Trying to apply advanced software design principles to a toy example which has the only purpose of illustrating a basic syntax concept is pointless. You might as well say he should use lower and getattr to map the operations to function names directly instead. It doesn't actually help him learn the things he doesn't know. And besides, you are talking about style and practice, and not even following PEP8. Lastly, stateful, or at least state changing objects are not the only useful objects. Look at re.MatchObject for example. –  Silas Ray Jan 11 '13 at 20:05
    
If by "the basics of classes" you mean "how to use classes as namespaces," then yes, the original code demonstrates that, but it didn't seem to me like a good demonstration of how to use classes, so I recommended not using them. Dictionaries, meanwhile, seem like a pretty basic component of Python (even if the data contained in each entry is a function), and judicious dictionary usage is frequently more useful than defining new classes. However, I also explained how classes could be (more usefully) used in this example. So what's problematic? –  Kyle Strand Jan 12 '13 at 1:13
    
(As for PEP8: I don't see anything in my code that violates PEP8 except perhaps the fact that I didn't capitalize calculator, and the "blah %s"%value syntax for string literals is no longer the preferred method for putting values into strings, but neither of those seem like particularly relevant issues. As for MatchObject, no, you can't change the state of the object once you've initialized it, but it still ties data to functionality, which is the core idea of oo programming.) –  Kyle Strand Jan 12 '13 at 1:17

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