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I'm currently working on the frontend for a project and right now I'm creating all the views. I have a template, which roughly looks like this:

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en-GB">

<head>
  <!-- TITLE -->
 <title>@yield('title')</title>
 /*Fonts, meta, css and script references go here too*/
</head>


<body id=@yield('body-id')>

 <!-- HEADER -->
  @section('header')
    <header id="sticky-header">
      /*Logo and some other stuff*/
      @include('navigation')
    </header>
@yield_section

<!--CONTENT-->
<div id="content">
  @yield('content')
</div>


<!--FOOTER-->
<footer id="footer" role="contentinfo">
  @yield('footer')
  /*Copyright stuff*/
    </footer>
  </body>

</html>

And my view, which looks like this:

@layout('templates.main')

@section('title')
Graddle.se - Home
@endsection

@section('body-id')
"start-page"
@endsection

<header id="header">
 <div class="social-buttons-container">
  <ul class="social-buttons">
  <li>{{ HTML::image('img/facebook_logo.png', 'Facebook', array('class' => 'social-button')); }}</li>
  <li>{{ HTML::image('img/twitter_logo.png', 'Twitter', array('class' => 'social-button')); }}</li>
   </ul>
  </div>
  @include('navigation')
</header>


@section('content')
The website content goes here! 
@endsection

@section('footer')
Footer stuff!
@endsection

Note that I will have two headers on this page. This is by design. So my problem is this:

I wanted to insert a to wrap the whole body to do some css-stuff. I inserted the code into the template and it showed up, and everything got wrapped except the footer. Also, when I check the source-code in the browser and in the Chrome inspector it shows up in a wierd order:

If I check the chrome inspector the markup is ordered like this:

<head>
</head>

<body id="start-page">
/*content from the <head> goes here*/

/*Webpage content goes here, sticky-header from the template etc*/

<footer>
Footer stuff
</footer>
</body>
</html>

Now, if I do ctrl-U and check the source code, the markup shows up like this:

<header id="header">
/*inserted by the view*/
</header>

<html>
<head>
/*Header stuff here, as it should be*/
</head>

<body id="start-page">

/*All the content*/

<footer>
Footer content
</footer>
</body>
</html>

Page looks fine though and everything is where it's supposed to be visually. So my questions are:

  • How do I insert a to wrap the whole content in body? Like I said, I can't wrap the footer.

  • Why is the order of the markup so messed up, and shows differently in the chrome inspector and in the source-code?

I realise it might be a little unclear (I deleted some stuff in between to make the example more clear to make it easier to understand), just ask me if it is!

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

1. How do I insert a to wrap the whole content in body? Like I said, I can't wrap the footer.

I don't quite understand what you meant by the footer not being wrapped. In the code you provided the <footer> tag resides inside <body> tag.

2. Why is the order of the markup so messed up?

It's because in your view file, you didn't wrap the <header> tag inside any sections. You should wrap it inside either header or content section, according to your visual needs:

@section('header')
    @parent <!-- keep what's in the inherited layout file -->

    <header id="header">
        <div class="social-buttons-container">
            <!-- ... -->
        </div>
        @include('navigation')
    </header>
@endsection

3. Shows differently in the chrome inspector and in the source-code?

The inspector is formatting and organizing the HTML beautifully so developers can worry less about messy source code. According to Goggle:

The Elements panel is sometimes a better way to "view source" for a page. Inside the Elements panel, the page's DOM will be nicely formatted, easily showing you HTML elements, their ancestry and their descendants. Too often, pages you visit will have minified or simply ugly HTML which makes it hard to see how the page is structured. The Elements panel is your solution for viewing the real underlying structure of the page.

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