Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm attempting to stop event propagation only for a specific event handler, while allowing others on the same event to propagate, here is an example:

function Control(parent) {
    this.Parent = $(parent);
    this.Parent.append('<div class="test"></div>');
    this.Test = $('.test', this.Parent).last();
    this.Test.bind('mousedown', this, Control_All);
    this.Test.bind('mousedown', this, Control_Top);
}
function Control_All(event) {
    //this should bubble up through both c1 and c2
}
function Control_Top(event) {
    //this should stop at c2
}
Control.prototype.constructor = Control;
Control.prototype.All = Control_All;
Control.prototype.Top = Control_Top;

var c1 = new Control('body');
var c2 = new Control(c1.Test);

In the example above c1.Test and c2.Test are the same size. I am attempting to make a mousedown event call these three events (I'm aware that the OO methodology isn't maintained and state is kept via event.data, but am using OO notation for simplicty, in my actual use case the All and Single delegates are bound variable orders and only in some instances, so the order in which they are bound cannot be controlled): c1.All c2.All c2.Single

I've attempted event.preventDefault(), event.stopPropagation(), event.stopImmediatePropagation() and return(false) at the end of Control_Top, but none work to do as described above.

Edit: Here is a JSFiddle Link to assist anyone interested in helping with it.

Edit again: Solved using a global and an extra bind to body.mousedown, here it is if anyone needs it, would welcome a solution that doesn't use a global or an extra binding.

share|improve this question
    
There's only one "event" happening. The event bubbles, not the event handler. If you stop the propagation of the event, it won't propagate to either handler. Just make your handlers more specific so that they only handle the event at the point you want them to handle it. –  Kevin B Jan 11 '13 at 18:19
    
Kevin, I solved it after your response and posted the solution in an edit, in my specific case the events are actually bound to a control from two different points (one internally that should bubble up, and one externally that should only be called once in spite of the fact controls can be nested inside of eachother, but listens on every control within a page). The global+extra bind solution I came up with feels a bit kludgy, but it works and I need to move on to the next part of this. –  CoryG Jan 11 '13 at 18:31
    
Is this what you wanted? jsfiddle.net/cvmEz/1 –  Kevin B Jan 11 '13 at 18:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just confirm that the event target is equal to the element you bound the event to.

http://jsfiddle.net/cvmEz/2/

function Control(parent,name) {
    this.Parent = $(parent);
    this.Parent.append('<div class="test" data-name="' + name + '"></div>');
    this.Test = $('.test', this.Parent).last();
    this.Test.bind('mousedown', this, Control_All);
    this.Test.bind('mousedown', this, Control_Top);
}
function Control_All(event) {
  if ( event.target == this) {
    console.log(this.getAttribute('data-name') + '.All');
  }
}
function Control_Top(event) {
  if ( event.target == this) {
    console.log(this.getAttribute('data-name') + '.Top');
  }
}
Control.prototype.constructor = Control;
Control.prototype.All = Control_All;
Control.prototype.Top = Control_Top;

var c1 = new Control('body', 'c1');
var c2 = new Control(c1.Test, 'c2');

console.log('--------');
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.