Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what is the method name that gets executed every time a member of a class is updated?

for example, init is run when an object is instantiated:

class Foo(db.Model)
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    description = db.Column(db.String(50))

    def __init__(self, description):
        self.description = description

i would like to add a method to this class that runs every time i update a Foo object.

after reading up on python classes here:

http://www.rafekettler.com/magicmethods.html

i thought that the method i was looking for would look something like the below (but haven't gotten it working yet):

class Foo(db.Model)
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    description = db.Column(db.String(50))

    def __init__(self, description):
        self.description = description

    def __call__(self, description):
        print 'obj is getting updated!'
        self.description = description

thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean updated in database (asking because of the flask-sqlalchemy tag) or just the class property? –  plaes Jan 11 '13 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

__call__ is used when you want to make the instances of your object callable, just like functions:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, foo):
        self.foo = foo

    def __call__(self):
        return 'foo is {}!'.format(self.foo)

foo = Foo('bar')
print foo()    # Note that we're calling instance of Foo as if it was a function.

What you probably want is __setattr__, which is called when a value is assigned to object's attribute:

class Foo(db.Model):
    # ...

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        # Call the parent class method first.
        super(Foo, self).__setattr__(name, value)
        print 'Value {!r} was assigned to attribute {}'.format(value, name)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.