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I'm trying to code something like this -

enter image description here

I'd love to add my coding attempt, only I don't really have a clue. When googling stuff like "jQuery countdown", "pie chart" etc. I find only plugins, where I want to code it myself. I'm not even sure whether this should be done with html5 canvas, jQuery or both..

What should be my first step?

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I like the spirit :) Well, canvas is definitely an option, but you can try the great Raphaël library: raphaeljs.com for nice vector graphics. Just take a look at: raphaeljs.com/pie.html isn't that beautifull? :D The rest will be just a timer. –  andr Jan 11 '13 at 18:40
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css-tricks.com/css-pie-timer –  Roko C. Buljan Jan 11 '13 at 18:41
    
"I'd love to add my coding attempt...I find only plugins, where I want to code it myself." So I think you're looking for a generic gameplan for coding this yourself? –  Jeromy French Jan 11 '13 at 19:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Drawing a "pie" section of a circle is a fairly trivial task.

For example:

ctx.fillStyle = "#f00";
ctx.beginPath();
ctx.moveTo(50,50);
ctx.arc(50,50,50, sta, sta + 2*Math.PI*pct);
ctx.fill();

The above code will draw an arc with a radius of 50 pixels. the forth and fifth parameters determine where the arc starts and ends. In your case, you want:

var sta = -Math.PI/2; // this is -90 degrees (or "up")

The variable pct is the percentage of the circle to be filled.

The real objective of your question is the Timer. I've created a simple Timer class that is very flexible with its output:

function Timer(duration /* in ms */ , props) {
    this.ontick = props && typeof props.ontick === "function" ? props.ontick : function() {};
    this.onend = props && typeof props.onend === "function" ? props.onend : function() {};
    this.interval = props && typeof props.interval === "number" ? props.interval : 1000 / 10;
    this.elapsed = 0;

    var running = false,
      start, end, self = this;

    this.start = function() {
      if (running) return this;

      start = new Date().getTime();
      end = start + duration;
      tick();
      running = true;

      return this;
    };

    function tick() {
      var now = new Date().getTime();
      self.ontick.call(self);
      self.elapsed = now - start;

      if (now < end) setTimeout(tick, self.interval);
      else self.onend.call(self);
    }
  }

Very basic usage of the Timer class could be something like this:

var timer = new Timer(10 * 1000, {
    ontick:function(){
        console.log(this.elapsed);
    },
    onend:function(){
        console.log('all done');
    }
}).start();

The nice thing about this Timer implementation is that it isn't cluttered with logic unrelated to counting down time, so it is very reusable.

I've created a sample of the output you would like here: http://jsfiddle.net/9jZsb/6/
You can see that I'm creating the animation myself, but it should be trivial to incorporate other libraries into this solution to accomplish a similar effect.

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Check out highcharts plotting library. They support animated rendering of their charts. They also do pie charts. http://www.highcharts.com/demo/dynamic-update

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