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I am trying to set a condition and set true or false as follows but it returns false all the time.

boolean checked = (categoriesCursor.getString(3) == "1") ? true
                    : false;

Log.i("Nomad",categoriesCursor.getString(3)+ " "+checked);

When i try to output the values i get the following.

01-12 00:05:38.072: I/Nomad(23625): 1 false
01-12 00:05:38.072: I/Nomad(23625): 1 false
01-12 00:05:38.072: I/Nomad(23625): 1 false
01-12 00:05:38.072: I/Nomad(23625): 1 false
01-12 00:05:38.072: I/Nomad(23625): 1 false
01-12 00:05:38.072: I/Nomad(23625): 0 false
01-12 00:05:38.072: I/Nomad(23625): 0 false
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6  
A comment on your code: Why are you using the ternary operator here? You could just say boolean checked = "1".equals(categoriesCursor.getString(3)); –  Daniel Kaplan Jan 11 '13 at 18:40
    
A comment on all the answers here: "1".equals(categoriesCursor.getString(3)); is better than categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1") because there's less opportunity for a NullPointerException. –  Daniel Kaplan Jan 11 '13 at 18:43
    
@DanielKaplan wow. i didnt know u could do something like that :D –  Harsha M V Jan 11 '13 at 18:45
2  
str.equals("literal") is better than "literal".equals(str) because errors relating to str containing null are caught, and it's more readable. (Also ? true : false is pointless - just leave it out.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jan 11 '13 at 19:02

8 Answers 8

up vote 29 down vote accepted

It returns false all the time because you are comparing references, not strings. You probably meant this instead:

boolean checked = (categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1")) ? true
                : false;

Which happens to be equivalent to this:

boolean checked = categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1");

And in case categoriesCursor.getString(3) may be null, you will be safer doing this instead:

boolean checked = "1".equals(categoriesCursor.getString(3));
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what does the last statement do ? –  Harsha M V Jan 11 '13 at 18:44
2  
@HarshaMV: It checks whether "1" is equal to the string you got from the cursor. –  K-ballo Jan 11 '13 at 18:45
2  
@HarshaMV: Java has string constants, and they behave as String objects; all methods available to the String class are also available to String constants. –  fge Jan 11 '13 at 18:58

Use equals instead of ==

boolean checked = (categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1"));
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Try using this

(categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1")) ? true : false;
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Use categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1") instead of ==

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Firstly, to compare strings, you'll have to use the equals method:

categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1")

Secondly, you don't need the ternary operator here. equals already results in a boolean, so simply assign it:

boolean checked = categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1");
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First there's no need for ternary operator. Then you must use equals() instead of == . Because == operator checks whether the references to the objects are equal.

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You can use equalsIgnoreCase() as well.

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Change it to this:

boolean checked = (categoriesCursor.getString(3).equals("1")) ? true : false;

Don't use == to compare String contents.

NOTE: The == operator can't be overloaded or modified in JAVA. If you are using object1 == object2, where object1 and object2 are Strings or any other object, you'll checking whether the references point to the same underlying object. This will not compare the contents.

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