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I have a table like this:

symbol  refseq          seqname start           stop            strand
Susd4   NM_144796       chr1    184695027       184826500       +
Ptpn14  NM_008976       chr1    191552147       191700574       +
Cd34    NM_001111059    chr1    196765080       196787475       +
Gm5698  NM_001166637    chr1    31034088        31055753        -
Epha4   NM_007936       chr1    77363760        77511663        -
Sp110   NM_175397       chr1    87473474        87495392        -
Gbx2                    chr1    91824537        91827751        -
Kif1a                   chr1    94914855        94998430        -
Bcl2    NM_009741       chr1    108434770       108610879       -

And I want to extract data with the following conditions:

1) lines that the values in "refseq" column are not missing

2) for the values in the columns "start" and "stop", only keep one value for each line: if the value in the column "strand" is "+", take the value in "start"; if the value in the column "strand" is "-", take the value in "stop".

And this is what expected:

Susd4   NM_144796   chr1    184695027   +
Ptpn14  NM_008976   chr1    191552147       +
Cd34    NM_001111059    chr1    196765080       +
Gm5698  NM_001166637    chr1        31055753    -
Epha4   NM_007936   chr1        77511663    -
Sp110   NM_175397   chr1        87495392    -
Bcl2    NM_009741   chr1        108610879   -
share|improve this question
    
how can I keep the TABs in the table of my post? now it looks terrible! –  Runner Jan 11 '13 at 19:23
    
you just want the start/stop value in output? can you paste an expected output as example? –  Kent Jan 11 '13 at 19:28
    
now it looks better, doesn't it? –  Kent Jan 11 '13 at 19:37
    
yes, thank you so much Kent! How did you format it? Sorry that I am a newbie. –  Runner Jan 11 '13 at 19:46
    
I didn't format it at all. just copied what you wrote there to my vim, and remove those <br>, then paste back. You did the nice job actually. ^_^ –  Kent Jan 11 '13 at 19:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would be very tempted to leave the input delimiter unmodified so blanks and tabs separate fields, rather than insisting on tabs only. That means you want records after the first (to skip the headings line) that have six fields:

awk 'NR > 1 && NF == 6 { if ($6 == "+") x = $4; else x = $5; print $1, $2, $3, x; }'

If you want to control the output format more, you can dink with OFS, or use printf:

awk 'BEGIN { OFS = "\t" }
     NR > 1 && NF == 6 { if ($6 == "+") x = $4; else x = $5; print $1, $2, $3, x; }'

awk 'NR > 1 && NF == 6 { if ($6 == "+") x = $4; else x = $5;
                         printf "%-8s %-12s %s %9s\n", $1, $2, $3, x; }'

There are other ways to handle it, I'm sure...

The first script produces:

Susd4 NM_144796 chr1 184695027
Ptpn14 NM_008976 chr1 191552147
Cd34 NM_001111059 chr1 196765080
Gm5698 NM_001166637 chr1 31055753
Epha4 NM_007936 chr1 77511663
Sp110 NM_175397 chr1 87495392
Bcl2 NM_009741 chr1 108610879

The content is correct, I believe; the formatting can be improved in many ways. The last script produces:

Susd4    NM_144796    chr1 184695027
Ptpn14   NM_008976    chr1 191552147
Cd34     NM_001111059 chr1 196765080
Gm5698   NM_001166637 chr1  31055753
Epha4    NM_007936    chr1  77511663
Sp110    NM_175397    chr1  87495392
Bcl2     NM_009741    chr1 108610879

You can tweak field widths as necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
If TAB is the delimiter, even "refseq" is empty, NF is still 6, so this script cannot remove lines with empty refseq. –  Runner Jan 11 '13 at 21:31
    
@Runner: empirically, the script works fine when the data has all blanks separating the fields, and when it has single tabs separating the fields except for the 'missing' fields where there are two adjacent tabs. By default (no -F option or futzing with FS, etc), awk treats any sequence of 1 or more 'blanks or tabs' as a field separator, which is actually extremely useful, especially in cases like this where it isn't completely clear what field separators are in use. I tested on both Linux (RHEL 5) and Mac OS X (10.7.5). It produced the same expected output on both. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 '13 at 21:45
    
The key point is not to tell awk that tab is the delimiter. It knows how to split things into fields automatically and most of the time correctly. There are occasions when you must tell it the delimiter; for example, if the data contained fields with internal spaces but tabs separating the fields, then it would be crucial to tell it about the tab delimiter. Your sample data doesn't show any tendency towards being awkward like that. If you really insist, you can add the -F option and then change the condition from NF == 6 to $2 == "", but it seems like harder work to me. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 '13 at 21:48
    
Ah, yes, when I removed BEGIN{FS=OFS="\t"}, it worked. Thank you so much!! One more question, how can I express "when NF is not 6"? I tried "!(NF==6)", but it didn't work as expected. –  Runner Jan 11 '13 at 21:58
    
Well, the direct operator would be NF != 6 but I would expect !(NF == 6) to work too unless you've got a shell which thinks ! means 'hysteria' (oops, 'history'). I don't let my shells be confused like that (so I don't use a sea shell, for example; they're best left on the sea-shore). Both ≠ notations worked for me when I tested on Mac OS X. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 11 '13 at 22:00

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r '1d;/(\S+\s+){5}\S+/!d;/\+$/s/\S+\s+//5;/-$/s/\S+\s+//4' file

EDIT:

  • 1d delete the header line
  • /(\S+\s+){5}\S+/!d; if the line does not have 6 fields delete it
  • /\+$/s/\S+\s+//5 if the line ends in + delete the 5th field
  • /-$/s/\S+\s+//4 if the line ends in - delete the 4th field
share|improve this answer

When you deal with a text file with fields, awk is usually better than sed because awk was designed to help parse text files with fields.

How are the columns in your table setup? Are they tab delimited, or do you use spaces to help line up the columns?

If this is a tab delimited table, you could use awk to check if the second field is null:

awk '
    {
        if ($2 == "") {
            print "Missing 'refseqence' in symbol " $1
        }
    ' $myfile

If your file uses spaces to align the various fields, you can still use awk by using its built in substr` function.

awk '
    {
        if (substr($0, 9, 12) ~ /^ *$/)
            print "Missing 'refsequence' in symbol " substr ($0, 1, 7)
        }
    }
' $myfile

By the way, I'm being rather wordy here to show you the syntax to make it understandable. I could have used a few shortcuts to put these on one line:

awk '$2 == "" {print "Missing refseqence in symbol " $1}' $myfile
awk 'substr($0, 9, 12) ~ /^  */ {print "Missing refsequnece in symbol " substr($0, 1, 7) }' $myfile 
share|improve this answer

quick and dirty, pls check if it works:

awk -F'\t' 'NR>1&&$2{print $NF=="+"?$4:$5}' file

output:

184695027
191552147
196765080
31055753
77511663
87495392
108610879

if you want other values in output too:

 awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS="\t"}NR>1&&NF==6{print $1,$2,$3,$NF=="+"?$4:$5}' file 

ouput:

Susd4   NM_144796       chr1    184695027
Ptpn14  NM_008976       chr1    191552147
Cd34    NM_001111059    chr1    196765080
Gm5698  NM_001166637    chr1    31055753
Epha4   NM_007936       chr1    77511663
Sp110   NM_175397       chr1    87495392
Bcl2    NM_009741       chr1    108610879

EDIT, adjust format to OP's output example:

awk 'BEGIN{FS=OFS="\t"}NR>1&&NF==6{$4=$NF=="+"?$4:" ";$5=$NF=="+"?" ":$5;print}' file

output:

Susd4   NM_144796       chr1    184695027               +
Ptpn14  NM_008976       chr1    191552147               +
Cd34    NM_001111059    chr1    196765080               +
Gm5698  NM_001166637    chr1            31055753        -
Epha4   NM_007936       chr1            77511663        -
Sp110   NM_175397       chr1            87495392        -
Bcl2    NM_009741       chr1            108610879       -
share|improve this answer
    
I tried the script, but I got the following error message:<br> awk: syntax error at source line 1 context is BEGIN{FS=OFS="\t"}NR>1&&NF==6{print >>> $1,$2,$3(NF)== <<< awk: illegal statement at source line 1 awk: illegal statement at source line 1 –  Runner Jan 11 '13 at 20:17
    
I used the awk command in MacOS. Does this make difference? –  Runner Jan 11 '13 at 20:23

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