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Could anyone tell me why data.i and data.f were corrupted? The website from which this code is from tries to explain it but uses bad grammar and many typos so I was wondering if anyone here might assist me.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

union Data
{
   int i;
   float f;
   char  str[20];
};

int main( )
{
   union Data data;        

   data.i = 10;
   data.f = 220.5;
   strcpy( data.str, "C Programming");

   printf( "data.i : %d\n", data.i);
   printf( "data.f : %f\n", data.f);
   printf( "data.str : %s\n", data.str);

   return 0;
}

When the above code is compiled and executed, it produces following result:

data.i : 1917853763
data.f : 4122360580327794860452759994368.000000
data.str : C Programming

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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're misunderstanding the purpose of a union. A union is meant to be used as a single variable that can store values for multiple types. But a union only allocates enough space for the type of the largest data member. So you can only use one data member at a time. As soon as you set the value of one member, it invalidates the other members.

If you want to be able to store values for multiple data members, you need to use a struct

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So a union is basically a variable that can hold different data types? –  user1596244 Jan 11 '13 at 19:29
    
@user1596244, yes exactly. –  Charles Salvia Jan 11 '13 at 19:30
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You have a union, that means only one member at a time can be live. When strcpying to the str memebr, the f member that overwote the i member is itself overwritten.

   data.i = 10;

stores into the int member, reading the float or the char[20] member would produce funny values, and possibly undefined behaviour.

   data.f = 220.5;

stores into the float member, the int previously stored is lost.

   strcpy( data.str, "C Programming");

stores into the str member, the previously stored float is lost.

The values printed for data.i and data.f are some bytes of the string interpreted as an int resp. float.

To use several members at the same time, you need a struct.

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This object, "mystruct", has an "int", followed by a "float", followed by a string. You can print any or all of the items.

struct mystruct
{
   int i;
   float f;
   char  str[20];
};

This object, "myunion", has an "int", a "float" and a string ALL SUPERIMPOSED ON TOP OF EACH OTHER. Data will be "valid" for only one of these types at a time.

union myunion
{
   int i;
   float f;
   char  str[20];
};

You would typically use unions something like this:

#define INT 0
#define FLOAT 1

struct x
{
    int type_tag;
    union
    {
      int x;
      float y;
    }
}

You'd assign a value to the "tag" at runtime to differentiate "treat this data as an int" (0) or "treat it as a float" (1).

'Hope that helps .. PSM

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I think you meant to write union myunion. –  Michael Foukarakis Jan 11 '13 at 19:31
    
@Michael Foukarakis - typo fixed. Thank you :) –  paulsm4 Jan 11 '13 at 19:35
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Actually, union differs from struct.

In the case of struct each member has it's own place in memory.

In the case of union all members are placed in the same memory. Thus, you actually have only one member at the moment, so you simply can not read all members of the union.

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