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Please, help me! I create many times in any jspx-pages this code

<c:if test="${not empty message}">
    <div id="message">
        <div class="${message.type}">${message.message}</div>
    </div>
</c:if>

Can i create tag once and include it to my pages, like (for example) in Rails i used :partial =>?

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2 Answers

Create a JSP-based custom tag and pass in the message, something like:

<%@ attribute name="message" required="true" %>
<c:if test="${not empty message}">
    <div id="message">
        <div class="${message.type}">${message.message}</div>
    </div>
</c:if>

See more details, including how to use the tag, where to put the tag, and so on. For all the gory details, see the Java EE 5 custom tag docs.

JSP-based custom tags are (more or less) the equivalent of partials, although you can also simply <jsp:include> JSP fragments. Tag files have some advantages, simple includes have some advantages–which makes the most sense is often a matter of debate.

I personally tend towards tags, I find them a bit more communicative.

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Plus this link from Java EE 5 documentation for the completeness: Custom Tags in JSP Pages –  informatik01 Jan 11 '13 at 19:58
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You can create a simple tag as follows.

     <jsp:root xmlns:c="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/core" xmlns:fn="http://java.sun.com/jsp/jstl/functions" 
xmlns:util="urn:jsptagdir:/WEB-INF/tags/util" xmlns:jsp="http://java.sun.com/JSP/Page" version="2.0">
      <jsp:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" />

      <jsp:directive.attribute name="description" type="java.lang.String" required="false" rtexprvalue="true" description="Some descripton" />
    </jsp:root>

Take a look at @Dave Newton Link to the documentation on how to set it up.

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