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I need to incorporate an IF statement to break the script when the user enters the letter Q.

I also need to display their input backwards to them - I am unsure on how I would do this, here is my code.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Scanner;


public class ArrayListOfNames {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException {

        ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
        Scanner Scan = new Scanner (System.in);

        String name;

        System.out.println("Please enter some words (You may press Q to finish):  ");

        while (Scan.hasNext())
        {
            name = Scan.nextLine();
            list.add(name);
        }


        Scan.close();

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
do you need to display the words or characters in reverse i.e. "This is input" "tupni si sihT" OR "input is This" –  Paul Sullivan Jan 11 '13 at 20:48
    
OR "sihT si tupni"... –  Paul Sullivan Jan 11 '13 at 20:50
    
"Then display whatever the user typed in backwards." Is what is says on the assignment :/ –  user1967788 Jan 11 '13 at 20:51
    
"adam mike john" backwards is "nhoj ekim mada"... It is 'key for key' backwards... –  Paul Sullivan Jan 11 '13 at 20:54
    
To do so you just need to store the input keys in a string and then print them out doing a loop from the back to the front. string has .length and you use a for loop i.e. for(int i = theString.length-1; i> 0; --i){print theString[i];} –  Paul Sullivan Jan 11 '13 at 20:56

6 Answers 6

To check against Q:

while(Scan.hasNext())
{
    name = Scan.nextLine();
    if(name.equals("Q") || name.equals("q"))
    {
        break;
    }
    list.add(name);
}

To show list in the reverse order:

for(int i = list.size() - 1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    System.out.println(list[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Use equalsIgnoreCase. –  David Conrad Jan 11 '13 at 21:40
    
@DavidConrad yes that would be the better, but the OP seemed to only want "Q" not "q", so I framed the equals as I did as a demonstration. –  NominSim Jan 11 '13 at 22:07

How about this.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Scanner;


public class ArrayListOfNames {

  public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException {

    ArrayList<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
    Scanner Scan = new Scanner (System.in);

    String name;

    System.out.println("Please enter some words (You may press Q to finish):  ");

    while (Scan.hasNext())
    {
        name = Scan.nextLine();
        if( name.equals("Q") ) {
           break;
        }
        list.add(name);
    }


    Scan.close();

  }

}
share|improve this answer

To display input backward put this code after loop that scans input.

for(int i = list.size()-1; i>=0; i--)
    System.out.println(list.get(i));
share|improve this answer
while (Scan.hasNext())
    {
        name = Scan.nextLine(); 
         //Input is stored to name, so you need to compare input with Q
         if("Q".equals(name)
          {
            //You need to exit the loop
             break;
          }
       list.add(name);
    }
//You have what ever user entered in list. So use iterator (or) for-each to print them out again.
share|improve this answer
    
"Q".equals(name) Yay for Yoda comparisons! :D –  Doorknob Jan 11 '13 at 21:09

As I suspect this is homework, there are probably extra marks for using the Stack class.

Get the data in the loop and push it onto the Stack. Then when you need to print it pop results from the Stack.

share|improve this answer
    
In should imagine using a stack is very much overkill - I would downgrade this approach as simple string manipulation is more lightweight AND the user should make sure they understand index traversal first –  Paul Sullivan Jan 11 '13 at 20:58
    
I agree it might be more efficient, but if it's homework understanding data structures like stack and queues is fundamental and it sounds like that might be the point of this. And Stack is a standard Java class and just as efficient as the List in the question and favored answer. –  Peter Wooster Jan 11 '13 at 23:22

From a Software Engineering standpoint, we try to stay away from using break; statements in loops. Instead, it's recommended to use a terminator

final String TERMINATOR = "Q";
boolean terminated = false;

while (scanner.hasNext() && !terminated)
{
    String line = scanner.next();

    if (!line.equals(TERMINATOR))
    {
       list.add(line);
    }
    else
    {
       terminated = true;
    }
}

Also note how we do !line.equals(TERMINATOR) instead of line.equals(TERMINATOR) and do the normal list appending. This is because list appending is the nominal case and as such we want to do the least amount of checks and jumping to get to it.

As for printing out your list in reverse, you can do a simple backwards iterative for-loop

for (int i = list.size()-1; i >= 0; i--)
{
    System.out.print(list.get(i) + " ");
}
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