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Trying to replicate the logic of a function that would work as follows:

given input params @a,@b,@c:

look up return value @v in table where column a=@a and b=@b and c=@c
if found, return @v
if not found, perform complex calculations to derive @v
insert into lookup table (a, b, c, v) values (@a, @b, @c, @v)
return @v

The idea is that looking up the value in the table will be much faster than the complex calculations. If you must do the complex calculations for a set of values, then add a row to the table so looking up the value of @v will be faster the next time.

Of course, you can't perform an INSERT statement in a UDF for side-effecting reasons.

I'm not asking for a hack that will allow me to perform an INSERT in a UDF, instead I'm asking for ideas on how I might re-design the code to perform this same type of logic? The goal is to use a UDF because we need to calculate the @v value for thousands of input value sets, which all exist in a table.

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Is all calculation only dependend from @a, @b, @c? –  bummi Jan 11 '13 at 21:02
    
yes, the same values of @a, @b, @c will always return the same @v. –  taglius Jan 11 '13 at 21:08
    
You can have a UDF that returns the expensive value and a flag that indicates whether it came from the cache or was calculated, but it looks like neither a UDF nor CLR function will meet all your needs. A stored procedure would have no problem with the functionality, but doesn't meet your desire for a function. –  HABO Jan 11 '13 at 22:03

3 Answers 3

EDIT: This is probably a better approach than the one below. Again, This is completely untested. It is meant only as a starting point for an idea.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.MyFN_MKII_1
(
    @a INT,
    @b INT,
    @C INT
)
RETURNS TABLE 
WITH SCHEMABINDING 
AS
    RETURN  SELECT  v 
            FROM MyTable
            WHERE a = @a
            AND b = @b
            AND c = @c
;
GO

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.MyFN_MKII_2
(
    @a INT,
    @b INT,
    @C INT
)
RETURNS INT
WITH SCHEMABINDING 
AS
-- place the body of the function here
BEGIN
     RETURN POWER(@a,@b)*@c
END
GO

---------------------
--  Usage
---------------------

INSERT INTO LookupTable
SELECT   ST.ColA
        ,ST.ColB
        ,ST.ColC
        ,ISNULL(V, dbo.MyFN_MKII_2(ST.COlA, ST.ColB, ST.ColC))
FROM SomeTable  ST
CROSS APPLY dbo.MyFN_MKII_1(ColA, ColB, ColC)

This is completely untested. It is meant only as a starting point for an idea. There are some very smart people around that can probably provide optimisations for the concept.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.MyFN
(
    @a INT,
    @b INT,
    @C INT
)
RETURNS @Result TABLE 
(
    a INT,
    b INT,
    c INT,
    v INT
)
AS
BEGIN

    INSERT INTO @Result (a, b, c, v)
    SELECT @a, @b, @c, v
    FROM MyTable
    WHERE a = @a
    AND b = @b
    AND c = @c

    IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0
    BEGIN
        INSERT INTO @Result (a, b, c, v)
        SELECT @a, @b, @c, POWER(@a,@b) * @c
    END

   RETURN
END
GO


---------------------
--  Usage
---------------------

INSERT INTO LookupTable
SELECT *
FROM SomeTable
CROSS APPLY dbo.MyFN(ColA, ColB, ColC)

I expect that this function will be relatively slow.

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This will not be the desired solution, but so far you are looking for other solutions ... You could create an INSERT TRIGGER on [LookUp], doing all the needed calculation. In preparation of your final query, using lookup instead of UDF you could force all needed values are in lookup, by:

Insert into [LookUp] (a,b,c)
Select ds.a,ds.b,ds.c from
(
Select Distinct a,b,c from [Source]
) ds
Left Join [LookUp] l on l.a=ds.a and l.b=ds.b and l.c=ds.c
Where l.a IS NULL
share|improve this answer

Since it appears that a single function that can calculate values and manage the cache is not in the cards, here is an example of a reasonably efficient means of providing values for an existing set of sample data. A UDF will provide cached or calculated values, but updating the cache remains separate.

set nocount on;

-- Create some sample data and a partial cache of calculated values.
create table Samples ( Id Int Identity, A Int, B Int, V Int Null );
insert into Samples ( A, B ) values
  ( 0, 0 ), ( 0, 1 ), ( 1, 0 ), ( 1, 1 ), ( 2, 0 ), ( 0, 2 ), ( 0, 1 ), ( 0, 1 );

create table Cache ( Id Int Identity, A Int, B Int, V Int );
insert into Cache ( A, B, V ) values
  ( 1, 1, 1 ), ( 0, 2, 4 );
go

-- Create the function to perform the expensive calculation.
create function dbo.ExpensiveCalculation( @A Int, @B Int )
  returns Int
  as
  begin
  return @A * @A + @B * @B;
  end;
go

-- And another function that can use cached values.
create function dbo.ExpensiveCalculationWithCaching( @A Int, @B Int )
  returns Int
  as
  begin
  declare @Result as Int
  -- Try to get a cached value.
  select @Result = V
    from Cache
    where A = @A and B = @B;
  -- If we didn't find a cached value then calculate one.
  if @@RowCount = 0
    select @Result = dbo.ExpensiveCalculation( @A, @B );
  return @Result;
  end;
go

-- Apply any previously cached values to the samples.
update S
  set S.V = C.V
  from Samples as S inner join
    Cache as C on C.A = S.A and C.B = S.B;
print Cast( @@RowCount as VarChar(6) ) + ' samples satisfied from initial cache.'

declare @BatchSize as Int = 3; -- Number of rows to process with the function in each iteration.
declare @CacheIds as Table ( Id Int );

-- Update the samples one batch at a time.
while exists ( select 42 from Samples where V is NULL )
  begin

  -- Clear the intermediate data, if any.
  delete from @CacheIds;

  -- Find a batch of unknown values with distinct input values and apply the function.
  --   Add the results to the cache and note the id's of the new rows.
  insert into Cache
    output inserted.Id into @CacheIds
    select top (@BatchSize) A, B, dbo.ExpensiveCalculation( A, B )
      from Samples
      where V is NULL
      group by A, B;
  print Cast( @@RowCount as VarChar(6) ) + ' cache entries added.'

  -- Update any samples that benefit from the newly cached values.
  update S
    set S.V = C.V
    from Samples as S inner join
      Cache as C on C.A = S.A and C.B = S.B inner join
      @CacheIds as CI on CI.Id = C.Id
    where S.V is NULL;
  print Cast( @@RowCount as VarChar(6) ) + ' samples satisfied from cache update.'
  end

-- Display the results.
select Id, A, B, V
  from Samples

select dbo.ExpensiveCalculationWithCaching( 1, 1 ) as Cached,
  dbo.ExpensiveCalculationWithCaching( 4, 4 ) as Calculated

-- Houseclean.
drop function dbo.ExpensiveCalculationWithCaching;
drop function dbo.ExpensiveCalculation;
drop table Samples;
drop table Cache;

Note: If rows are added to the Samples table is updated during the execution of this code they may not be processed.

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