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People frown upon the center tag, but for me it always works just the way I want it. Nevertheless, center is deprecated so I'll make an effort.

Now I see many people suggest the cryptic CSS margin: 0 auto; but I can't even get it to work (see fiddle here). Other people will go modify position or display, but that always breaks something else.

How can I center a span using css so that it behaves exactly like the center tag?

<div class="container">
  <span class='btn btn-primary'>Click me!</span>
</div>
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Span is an inline element, and the margin: 0 auto for centering only works on non-inline elements that have a width that is less than 100%.

One option is to set an alignment on the container, though this probably isn't what you want for this situation:

div.container { text-align: center }

http://jsfiddle.net/MgcDU/1270/

The other option is to change the display property of the span:

/* needs some extra specificity here to avoid the display being overwritten */
span.btn.btn-primary { 
  display: table;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

Using display: table eliminates the need to hard code a specific width. It will shrink or grow as appropriate for its content.

http://jsfiddle.net/MgcDU/1271/

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2  
That's the kind of thing I hate about CSS. display: table, WTF? –  Randomblue Jan 11 '13 at 21:16
    
Well, it works. Table is just a poorly chosen value name and doesn't really describe how it flows like some of the other display property values (inline, block, inline-block, etc.). –  cimmanon Jan 11 '13 at 21:25

You make the span block level, give it a width so margin:auto works

see this fiddle

.center {
         display:block;
         margin:auto auto;
         width:150px; //all rules upto here are important the rest are styling
         border:1px solid black;
         padding:5px;
         text-align:center;
}

UPDATE: In order to NOT specify a width and have natural width of element on the span you will have to use textalign on parent

see this fiddle

.container{text-align:center}
.center {
  border:1px solid black;
  padding:5px;
}
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No. I don't want to have to specify a width just for centering. No way. –  Randomblue Jan 11 '13 at 21:17
1  
@Randomblue well if it doesn't have a width specified it is still centered - it just takes up the full width! think about it... Without width what is to be centered. –  Paul Sullivan Jan 11 '13 at 21:19
1  
I want it to take its "natural width". Is it really that difficult with CSS? center preserves "natural width". –  Randomblue Jan 11 '13 at 21:20
1  
or you can use display:table; margin:0 auto; as another poster suggested (though dubious ;)) –  Paul Sullivan Jan 11 '13 at 21:32
1  
@PaulSullivan width: 0px; won't give the effect of centering a block element. For example, see jsfiddle.net/5c4ec. The DIV becomes 0 pixels wide, but the content (the button) extends from the left of the 0 pixel wide centered DIV. display: inline-block; is closer to "natural width", but it doesn't center with margin: 0 auto;. The best solution in a case like that is to just wrap the element in a new element with text-align: center; applied. margin: 0 auto; is almost exclusively for cases where you know the centered element's width. –  thirdender Jan 11 '13 at 21:47

You can set .container { text-align:center; } so that everything inside div.container will be centered.

In general, there are two ways centering things.

  1. To center inline elements (such as text, spans and images) inside their parents, set text-align: center; on the parent.
  2. To center a block level element (such as header, div or paragraph), it must first have a specified width (width: 50%; for example). Then set the left and right margins to auto. Your example of margin: 0 auto; says that the top and bottom margin should be 0 (this doesn't matter for centering) ad that the left and right margins should be auto - they should be equal to each other.

The <center> element is really just a block-level element with text-align:center;. If you sent border: solid red 1px; on it, you can see that it's 100% wide, and that everything inside it is centered. If you change text-align to left, then its children are no longer centered. Example: http://jsfiddle.net/KatieK/MgcDU/1275/. Perhaps you should just consider your <div class="container"> with text-align:center; } to be equivalent to <center>.

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Are you saying an inline element needs to be wrapped in a parent just for centering if its siblings are not to be centered? –  Randomblue Jan 11 '13 at 21:15
    
What would an inline element be centered against if its siblings are not to be centered? –  KatieK Jan 11 '13 at 21:18
    
Whatever center does. –  Randomblue Jan 11 '13 at 21:18
    
So that I'm answering the right question, can you give an example including center? –  KatieK Jan 11 '13 at 21:20
    
Please see here. –  Randomblue Jan 11 '13 at 21:22

<span> is an inline element. <div> is a block element. That's why it is not centering.

<div class="container" style='float:left; width:100%; text-align:center;'>
  <span class='btn btn-primary'>Click me!</span>
</div>

You can center the content of span only when you convert it into block, using 'inline-block' style.

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The included bootstrap library is handling the application of the display: inline-block; property. –  thirdender Jan 11 '13 at 21:47

Your parent element needs to have a larger width in order to let a child element be positioned within it. After that the trick with margin: 0 auto; is getting the parent and child container position and display values to be compatible with each other.

.container {
  border: 2px dashed;
  width: 100%;}

.btn {
  display: block;
  margin: 0 auto;
  width: 25%;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/rgY4D/2/

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width: 25%? Surely not. I don't want the button to change width when adjusting the window size! –  Randomblue Jan 11 '13 at 21:19
1  
@Randomblue it is an example. You could set a fixed width but percentages are very common with responsive design. –  Dylan Valade Jan 11 '13 at 21:20

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