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Let's say I have a vector of Polygons, where each polygon contains a vector of Points. I have to iterate over all the points of all the polygons many times in my code, I end up having to write the same code over and over again:

for(std::vector<Polygon*>::const_iterator polygon = polygons.begin();
                polygon != polygons.end(); polygon++)
{
        for(std::vector<Point>::const_iterator point = (*polygon)->points.begin();
                        point != (*polygon)->points.end(); point++)
        {
                (*point).DoSomething();
        }
}

I really feel that is a lot of code for two simple iterations, and feel like it's clogging the code and interfering with the readability.

Some options I thought are:

  • using #defines - but it would make unportable (to use in other parts of the code). Furthermore, #defines are considered evil nowadays;
  • iterate over vector->size() - it doesn't seem the most elegant way;
  • calling a method with a function pointer - but in this case, the code that should be inside of the loop would be far from the loop.

So, what would be the most clean and elegant way of doing this?

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5  
With C++11, auto would clean this up dramatically. Also for_each()... –  Drew Hall Jan 11 '13 at 21:12
2  
Ranged-for is another option. –  chris Jan 11 '13 at 21:13
2  
In c++11 you have range-based for-loops –  Lol4t0 Jan 11 '13 at 21:15
    
Defining a segmented iterator wrapper would be nice, but it results in one extra comparison per iteration that compilers have a hard time removing. –  Marc Glisse Jan 11 '13 at 21:16
    
@jozefg Is (*polygon), because (*polygon) is the object and polygon is the iterator. –  André Wagner Jan 11 '13 at 21:17

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

In C++11, using ranged-base for loops and the auto keyword:

for(const auto& polygon : polygons) {
    for(const auto& point : polygon->points) {
        point.DoSomething();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Exactly what I needed! –  André Wagner Jan 11 '13 at 21:29
1  
@AndréWagner be careful about over-use of auto, because it can lead to lack of documentation about what the hell types are being used. :) –  Yakk Jan 11 '13 at 22:04

If you can't use C++11, boost has a FOREACH macro which generates a lot of code but dramatically simplifies your code:

BOOST_FOREACH(Polygon * polygon, polygons)
{
    BOOST_FOREACH( Point & point, polygon->points )
    {
        point.doSomething();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you can't use C++11, maybe typedef the iterator type to something shorter like

typedef std::vector<Polygon*>::const_iterator PolyCit;
for (PolyCit polygon = polygons.begin(); polygon != polygons.end(); polygon++)
share|improve this answer

The inner loop can be rewritten using algorithms like this:

std::for_each(
    (*polygon)->points.begin(), (*polygon)->points.end(), 
    &Point::DoSomething
);

Mixing this with the outer loop is a bit more complex:

std::for_each(
    polygons.begin(), polygons.end(),
    []( Polygon* polygon ) {
        std::for_each(
            polygon->points.begin(), polygon->points.end(), 
            &Point::DoSomething
        );
    }
);

If we had some kind of compound iterator we could really express your intent, which is to do something for each point in each polygon. And a range library like Boost.Range would allow you to avoid naming each container twice, given that you want to work with their entire range.

My ideal version of your code would look like this:

for_each( flatten( polygons ), &Point::DoSomething );

were flatten would return a view of every Point in every Polygon as if it were a single continuous range. Note that this is something that can be accomplished in plain C++03, and all we are missing from Boost.Range to accomplish it is a flatenning range, which shouldn't be difficult to implement in terms of range join.

Otherwise, the range-based for-loop together with auto will help you reduce the boilerplate of iterating throw a range and forgetting about the complicated types.

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You need a layer of abstraction. Instead of dealing with a vector of polygons, write a class that manages that vector. The class then provides iterator pairs for iterating over the points. The code in the iterator knows and encapsulates those details.

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Nevermind, this won't work for you since you have a vector of pointers at the top level, but I'll keep it up, because I think it's pretty cool.


My template metaprogramming is a bit rusty, so there might be a simpler way to do this, but:

template<typename C, typename F, size_t depth>
struct nested_for_each_helper
{
    static void do_it(C& c, F& f)
    {
        for (auto& i : c)
            nested_for_each_helper<decltype(i),F,depth-1>::do_it(i,f);
    }
};

template<typename C, typename F>
struct nested_for_each_helper<C,F,0>
{
    static void do_it(C& c, F& f)
    {
        f(c);
    }
};

template<size_t depth, typename C, typename F>
void nested_for_each(C& c, F& f)
{
    nested_for_each_helper<C,F,depth>::do_it(c,f);
}

int main()
{        
    int n[3][3][3][3];
    int i = 0;
    nested_for_each<4>(n,[&i](int& n) { n = i++; });
    nested_for_each<4>(n,[](int n){
        std::cout << n << ' ';
    });
}

For your case, you can use it like this (no you can't):

nested_for_each<2>(polygons, [](Point const& p) { p.DoSomething(); });
share|improve this answer
    
points doesn't appear anywhere (yes, he has a complication on top of nested iteration). –  Marc Glisse Jan 11 '13 at 21:37

First of all, there's the plain old integer-based loop. A bit shorter than iterators.

for( int i = 0 ; i < polygons.size() ; i++ )
{
    for( int j = 0 ; j < polygons[i]->points.size(); j++)
    {
        Point* p = polygons[i]->points[j] ;
        p->DoSomething();
    }
}

If you don't like that, and you don't have C++11 available, you can write function that accepts a functor (these were in C++0x under std::tr1 I believe):

void eachPoint( function<void (Point* p)> func )
{
    for( int i = 0 ; i < polygons.size() ; i++ )
    {
        for( int j = 0 ; j < polygons[i]->points.size(); j++)
        {
            Point* p = polygons[i]->points[j] ;
            func(p);
        }
    }
}

Alternatively, a plain old macro:

#define EACH_POLYGON( polyCollection ) for( int _polyI = 0 ; _polyI < polyCollection.size() ; _polyI++ ) \
for( int _ptNo = 0, Point* p=polyCollection[_polyI]->points[0] ; j < polyCollection[_polyI]->points.size() && (p=polyCollection[_polyI]->points[_ptNo]); _ptNo++)

EACH_POLYGON( polyCollection )
{
    p->DoSomething();
}
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