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I'm having a funny issue with IE. I have a big page, where part of the code is something like this:

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<table width="100%" border="0" cellSpacing="0" cellPadding="0">
<tr>
<TD style="PADDING-RIGHT: 2px" >Label:
</TD>
<TD  >
    <LABEL style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap">
    <INPUT  type="radio" name="inputs" /> 
    input 1 
    </LABEL>

    <LABEL style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap">
    <INPUT type="radio" name="inputs" /> 
    input 2 blah bblah </LABEL>
</TD>
</tr>
</table>
</body>
</html>

Then, when I change the width of the page, I want the radio buttons+label to break in a second line. That works fine with all browsers, and in IE with the code I'm using as example. The thing is that is the same, except for other stuff in the page, and it has another table around the table in my example. But, it does not break. The two radiobuttons+lable always stay in the same line. But, when I put &nbsp; between the end of the first label and beginning of second, it breaks but adds a space at the beginning of the second line. I don't want to copy the whole page, but I was wondering if someone would have a brilliant idea on how to solve this..

Thanks for reading!

Update: I noticed that if I remove the style="WHITE-SPACE: nowrap" from the first label, the second radio button+label will break to the next line. But it will probably break in case "input 1" text is too big (and I want to avoid that). so I'm not really sure how to prevent that.

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1  
Can You give a link to that page? –  bumerang Jan 11 '13 at 22:12
    
Unfortunately I can't (not my choice, though). I know it's hard for you guys to help me this way, but I was just hoping someone might have a good guess.. –  BMF Jan 11 '13 at 22:36
    
" The thing is that is the same, except for other stuff in the page, and it has another table around the table in my example." - so maybe the parent table is making troubles? –  bumerang Jan 11 '13 at 22:40
    
<input> does not go into <label> –  Ibu Jan 11 '13 at 22:40
1  
Of course it does! Try to click radiobutton without label around! When it's wrapped by the label You can click the lable to select it –  bumerang Jan 11 '13 at 22:50

1 Answer 1

LABEL element is inline by default. Add LABEL {display: block; } rule to your CSS. Or use display: inline-block instead of display: block if you want to prevent breaking line inside separate input/label pair while having ability to break line between pairs when needed. In IE 6/7 (if needed), similar effect can be achieved with display: inline; zoom: 1;.

By the way, your code is quite old-school and would benefit from being converted to more semantic/structural markup. For example:

<dl>
    <dt><label for="example">Example label</label></dt>
    <dd><input type="text" name="example" id="example" /></dd>

    <dt><label for="foobar">Foobar</label></dt>
    <dd><input type="text" name="foobar" id="foobar" /></dd>
</dl>
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Heh.. definition lists are ancient and this is not their purpose. It should be using <div>s –  Philip Whitehouse Jan 12 '13 at 0:16
    
That's not truth. Definition lists are one of most semantic things in HTML, and their purpose is to union DT/DD groups where each group contain things that are someway interrelated, not necessarily literally a term and its definition(s). HTML5 says: "Name-value groups may be terms and definitions, metadata topics and values, questions and answers, or any other groups of name-value data." –  Marat Tanalin Jan 12 '13 at 1:41
    
If you want to group inputs and their labels as a collection, use a fieldset. –  Philip Whitehouse Jan 12 '13 at 11:41
    
FIELDSET and DL are not mutually exclusive. –  Marat Tanalin Jan 12 '13 at 17:00
1  
It seems you need to reformulate your question from scratch. Maybe you want to prevent breaking line inside separate input/label pair while having ability to break line between pairs when needed? Then you should use display: inline-block instead of display: block in my answer. –  Marat Tanalin Jan 14 '13 at 20:46

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