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I'm currently learning Haskell, Which language (F# or Haskell) do you prefer for programming general purpose applications?

Which do you think is the stronger language?

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closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Aug 8 '12 at 14:57

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Why did you leave OCaml out? –  Ycros Sep 27 '08 at 5:54
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F# is owned by Microsoft, therefore, Haskell. –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Dec 18 '10 at 5:22
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7 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

I'd go for Haskell. HackageDB is a great collection of libraries that are written specifically for the language. In the case of F# you'd have to use mostly libraries that are not written with a functional language in mind so they will not be as 'elegant' to use. But, of course it depends largely on how much functional programming you want to do and constraints of the project you want to use it for. Even 'general purpose' does not mean it should be used in all cases ;)

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I prefer Haskell.

Jon Harrop's claim that Haskell has poor tools caused me to think a bit, since I quite disagree with this. I think that the issue here is partly one of development style. Let's compare a few tool-related characteristics of F# and GHC:

  1. F# has extensive visual tools and GHC has none. For me, the lack of visual tools is irrelevant: I work with vi, a Unix command line, and a heavily custom build system. The lack of support for my style of development in F# would be very trying for me. On the other hand, if you prefer working under a Visual-Studio-type environment, you'd have quite the reverse opinion.

  2. F# and/or .NET I understand has a very good debugger. GHC has only a limited debugger that runs in the interpreter. I've not used a debugger in years (much of this due to using test-driven development) and when you work mostly with pure functions, as in Haskell, a debugger is much less necessary. So for me, the lack of this tool is fairly irrelevant.

  3. Libraries. This depends mostly on what libraries you need, doesn't it? Lots of good ones doesn't help if the one you need isn't there, and having lots of poorly-designed libraries may not be so helpful. Haskell certainly has fewer libraries than .NET, but it does have a reasonable selection, and the quality of the API design in many of them is very, very high.

I don't know what F#'s interface into native code libraries is like, but GHC is great for this, due to the fantastic FFI. I wrote a Windows DDE server entirely in Haskell (yes—not a line of C, not even to deal with callbacks from Windows C libraries) and it took considerably less time and was considerably simpler than doing the same thing in C or C++. If you need native code interfaces, Haskell is certainly the better choice.

The "unpredictability" of memory usage and performance is a good point. Haskell seems to me actually reasonably predictable if you know what you're doing, but you won't know what you're doing when you start out, and you'll have a lot to learn. F# is much more similar to other .NET languages.

Overall, this question probably comes down more to the platform than the language: the huge difference between the "Unixy world" of GHC generating native code and the "Windowsy world" of F# running on .NET is not a language issue.

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All fair points. I think Windows Presentation Foundation is an obvious counter example in the context of libraries though: it is far better designed and more powerful than anything available from Haskell (e.g. Qt). I would also advise technical users to seriously consider switching platforms just to use F#. I prefer Linux to Windows but .NET is just so far ahead of anything available on Linux or Mac OS X now... –  Jon Harrop Jul 31 '09 at 16:08
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"I don't know what F#'s interface into native code libraries is like, but...If you need native code interfaces, Haskell is certainly the better choice". Sounds unjustified. –  Jon Harrop Nov 25 '10 at 20:21
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I'd say F#, as you can access the entire .Net framework. However, that's more of a library thing.

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It depends what you want to do:

Haskell is the more purely functional language of the two.

F# is more of a hybrid language, and not purely functional, but has a great set of base class libraries that you can use to do modern things easily on Windows or Mono.

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F# also works on Mono. –  TraumaPony Sep 27 '08 at 5:25
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But thats with a different platform, he doesnt deserve a downvote. –  Rayne Sep 27 '08 at 5:29
    
F# is a language for the CLI; therefore, it's the same platform. –  TraumaPony Sep 27 '08 at 5:30
    
thanks guys, fixed description. –  Brian R. Bondy Nov 3 '08 at 13:09
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I think Jon Harrop has a serious downer on Haskell for some reason. It's simply not true that it is not used outside of academia in fact it is widely used in investment banking and far more so than F# and OCaml are and for good reason. If you want a job functional programming then learn Haskell as there are far more posts advertised for Haskell programmers than F# or OCaml. I'm sure F# will gain popularity as it has Microsoft behind it and it is starting from zero but at the moment Haskell has a clear lead.

Probably 2 or 3 years ago, OCaml led the field in practical functional languages but since then Haskell has overtaken it with more libraries, more features, better performance and wider commercial use.

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"I think Jon Harrop has a serious downer on Haskell for some reason". I have a downer on bullshit. "...it is widely used in investment banking and far more so than F# and OCaml are and for good reason". Bullshit like that. –  Jon Harrop Nov 25 '10 at 20:31
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"OCaml led the field in practical functional languages but since then Haskell has overtaken it with more libraries, more features, better performance and wider commercial use". More libraries, yes. More features, maybe. Better performance, no way. Wider commercial use, where is the Haskell equivalent of XenSource (recently sold to Citrix for $500,000,000)? –  Jon Harrop Nov 25 '10 at 21:14
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You might find this blog post by Neil Mitchell informative:

F# From a Haskell Perspective

The comments are also illuminating.

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Neil begins by stating that he knows very little about ML and then draws several flawed comparisons between F# and ML, concluding that F# inherits its flaws from ML. That is just worthless nonsense. If you want to know about ML, ask someone who knows ML (i.e. not Neil). –  Jon Harrop Jul 31 '09 at 16:00
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I'd say it depends on why you are learning it. If you are doing it for the experience of a pure functional language, go for Haskell. But if you are definitely going to use the language for more than that, F# is might be the better choice.

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