Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what will be the best way to find a prime number so that the time complexity is much reduced.

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Bill the Lizard May 25 '12 at 13:05

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Are you looking for prime numbers, or are you looking to test if a number you have is prime? –  fbrereto Sep 15 '09 at 18:10
27  
"2". Now you're done for all time. –  RBarryYoung Sep 15 '09 at 18:11
4  
Unless, you had some, you know, "requirements" or "specifications". –  RBarryYoung Sep 15 '09 at 18:12
4  
there are approximately 1000 duplicates of your question along with an answer at SO, and millions more to find via google –  DaClown Sep 15 '09 at 18:28
1  
Build a list of primes first. Then you can use this list for future references. –  Wim ten Brink Sep 15 '09 at 19:11

9 Answers 9

up vote 42 down vote accepted

When it comes to finding prime numbers, the Sieve of Eratosthenes and the Sieve of Atkin are two possible solutions. The Sieve of Eratosthenes has a complexity of O((n log n)(log log n)). The Sieve of Atkin has a complexity of O(N / log log n).

If you have a number and you want to find out if it's prime, that is called performing a primality test. The naive approach is to check all numbers m from 2 to sqrt(n) and verify that n % m is not 0. If you want to expand this slightly, you can throw out all even numbers (except 2). There are also some other enhancements to this naive approach that might improve performance, along with other, more advanced techniques.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1, I've never heard of sieve of Atkins before. Thanks. –  avakar Sep 15 '09 at 18:16
2  
Throw out the even number apart from 2... –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '09 at 21:11
    
Jonathan - Thanks for pointing that out. I edited the post to reflect that. –  Thomas Owens Sep 15 '09 at 21:51
    
@ThomasOwens What is reason for checking from 2 to sqrt(n) in the naive approach ? –  Geek Aug 14 '12 at 4:55
    
@Geek If the number was not prime, at least one factor must be below sqrt(n). Assuming you're not trying to factor the number, it doesn't matter what all of the factors are. You just need to know that some factor exists. –  Thomas Owens Aug 14 '12 at 10:29

Use sieve of Eratosthenes is if you want to enumerate primes. If you want to generate a large prime, generate a random odd number and check for primality.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it. +1 –  Kirschstein Sep 15 '09 at 18:10
    
Wikipedia points to the Sieve of Atkin as being more efficient than the Sieve of Eratosthenes... –  Thomas Owens Sep 15 '09 at 18:14
    
Thomas, I've removed the claim of optimality. Thanks. –  avakar Sep 15 '09 at 18:17
    
+1. The Sieve of Eratosthenes is supposed to be fairly easy to implement, although I've never done so...perhaps I will, just to see. It might not be the best performer, but from what I can tell, it's usually good enough. –  Thomas Owens Sep 15 '09 at 18:23

If it's below a certain range, best way would be to look it up in a precomputed list. There's plenty of them, up to very high numbers.

Example, all the primes up to 10,000,000,000 at http://www.prime-numbers.org/

share|improve this answer

Inspired by xkcd:

int findPrimeNumber() {
    return 2; // guaranteed to be prime
}
share|improve this answer
3  
If you're going to post a purely humorous answer to a serious question, at least make it community wiki. –  Mark Ransom Sep 15 '09 at 18:29
2  
I would come back with the smart-alecky response that this IS a serious answer... but really I just didn't know you could make answers community wiki (and that I honestly did not expect any upvotes for such a ridiculous answer). –  Dan Tao Sep 15 '09 at 18:33
1  
ahh crap you beat me to it. lol –  Neil N Sep 15 '09 at 18:49
3  
To be honest, it does satisfy the OP's request. However, my finely honed sense of telepathy, gained by trying to get requirements out of users without violating the Hague and Geneva Conventions, suggests that this isn't all the OP wants. –  David Thornley Sep 15 '09 at 18:51
    
huh, would you look at that, you can make answers CW now! How long have I been blind to that feature? –  Matt Sep 15 '09 at 20:06

If you want to generate primes from 1 to whatever, then the fastest way is probably a wheeled Sieve as implemented here, which can typically test more than 3,000,000 candidate primes a second on an average laptop (and that's using an unoptimized language like VB.net), and factor the non-primes to boot. In c++ it could be easily 5 to 20 times faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Although I'm not a fan of VB.NET, the "5-20" times faster seems a little over the top. But... +1 for the link –  Philippe Leybaert Sep 15 '09 at 18:37
    
Granted it's hard to say: but my understanding is that VB.net does no loop, etc. code-type optimizations and this program/algorithm is exactly the kind of algorithm can go gangbusters on. OTOH, if it were making heavy use of non-replaceable .NET calls, then the difference would be a lot less. –  RBarryYoung Sep 15 '09 at 18:40
    
(wish I was more proficient in VC++, I'd just re-code it and see what the difference was). –  RBarryYoung Sep 15 '09 at 18:43
    
OTOH .NET uses jit which for a repetetive task like this should be able to optimize quite a bit. –  Esben Skov Pedersen Sep 15 '09 at 19:16
1  
RBarryYoung, see "Is Managed Code Slower Than Unmanaged Code?" grimes.demon.co.uk/dotnet/man_unman.htm –  Alex Budovski Dec 5 '09 at 4:23

Although there are more efficient algorithms, the Miller-Rabin primality test is one of the simplest tests to implement.

share|improve this answer

There are two different questions:

1) How to find if a number is a prime number? If you discover an efficient algorithm for this one, you will be famous for the next 2000 years ;)

2) How to find the prime numbers up to a limit N?

probably this is what you are asking about. Sieve of Atkin is the most efficient one If your range or limit N is really big number. In reasonable ranges, you could implement an optimized variation of Sieve of Eratosthenes. I found these two sites to be more than useful:

EDIT: @avakar

While I am more than beginner on the subject, I don't think AKS is the waited algorithm! From the same source:

However, some composite numbers also satisfy the equivalence. The proof of correctness for AKS consists of showing that there exists a suitably small r and suitably small set of integers A such that if the equivalence holds for all such a in A then n must be prime.

share|improve this answer
    
There is an efficient (as in polynomial) algorithm: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AKS_primality_test –  avakar Sep 15 '09 at 19:08
    
-1: There already are extremely efficient algorithms for this. Sub-linear, for serial tests. –  RBarryYoung Sep 16 '09 at 2:06
    
What is described in the "Black Key Sieve" is just a primitive version of a wheeled sieve. –  RBarryYoung Sep 16 '09 at 2:09
    
(took the -1 back, considering there is some explanation of the differences) –  RBarryYoung Sep 16 '09 at 2:10
    
AraK, AKS will polynomially and deterministically determine whether an integer is a prime. The two sentences you cited merely point out what must be proven in order for the algorithm to be considered correct. (And the original paper provides the proof.) –  avakar Sep 16 '09 at 15:00

Take a look at existing libraries e.g. OpenSSL and GNU MP.

share|improve this answer

I found a way.But may its lengthy, but its perfect ..no flaws in it.

package javaapplication4;
import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Main
{ 
    static Vector vprime = new Vector();
    static Vector vnotprime = new Vector();
    static Vector newVect = new Vector(new LinkedHashSet());
    static TreeSet<Integer> st = new TreeSet<Integer>();
    static int n = 0;
    static int starr[];    

    void prime()
    {
        Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter number to begin");
        int beg = sc.nextInt();
        System.out.println("Enter number to end");
        int end = sc.nextInt();
        try
        {
            for (int i = beg; i <= end; i++)
            {
                if (i == 1)
                {
                    vnotprime.add(i);
                    st.add(i);
                }
                if (i == 2)
                {
                    vprime.add(i);
                }
                if (i%2 != 0 && i%(Math.sqrt(i)) != 0)
                {
                    vprime.add(i);
                }
                if (i%2 == 0 && i != 2)
                {
                    vnotprime.add(i);
                    st.add(i);
                }
                if (i%(Math.sqrt(i)) == 0)
                {
                    vnotprime.add(i);
                    st.add(i);   
                }
                /*if (i%(Math.sqrt(i)) == 0 && i != 1)
                {
                    vnotprime.add(i);
                }*/
            }
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            System.out.println("Enter proper value");
        }   
    }

    void showprime()
    {
        System.out.println("Prime Numbers are");
        Iterator it = vprime.iterator();
        while (it.hasNext())
        {
            System.out.println(it.next());
            for (int i : st)
            {    
            }
        }
    }

    void shownonprime()
    {
        System.out.println("these are non-Prime Numbers are");
        Iterator it = st.iterator();
        int len = st.size(), k = 0;
        starr = new int[len];
        while (it.hasNext())
        {
            System.out.println(it.next());
        }
        for (int i:st)
        {
            starr[k++] = i;
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, Exception
    {
        Main m = new Main();
        m.prime();
        m.showprime();
        m.shownonprime();
        for(int i = 0; i < starr.length; i++)
        {
            System.out.println("I got it " + starr[i]);
        }            
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Your code is unreadable, please format it better! –  Kleist Nov 28 '10 at 11:54

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.