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I am trying to learn CSS, so far it seems that changing HTML to CSS is more of just changing font, colors, text size, tables and background to some CSS statements.

My problem is I am not sure what HTML I still need and what to remove. Where do I put the CSS stuff? Basic HTML trying to learn with this easy one:

<html>
<head>
<title>CSS practice</title>
</head>

<body style="background-color:white;">

<table border="1" width="990" bgcolor="#99CCFF">
  <tr>
    <td width="990"><p align="center"><font face="Arial Black" size="6" color="#680000">DDDD</font></td>
</tr>
</table>
<table border="0" width=990 bgcolor="#000000" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
<tr>
<td width="990"><font color="#FFFFFF" face="Arial" size="2"><b> Personal Portfolio</b>    </font></td>
</tr>
</table>
<table border="0" width=990 cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
<tr>
<td width="18%" bgcolor="#99CCFF" valign="top">&nbsp;
  <p style="margin-left: 20"><b><font face="Arial" size="2" color="#000000">
  <a href="index.html"> Home </a><br><br>
  <a href="about.html"> About Me </a><br><br>
  <a href="outreach.html"> Outreach </a><br><br>
  <a href="contact.html"> Contact Me </a><br><br>
  <a href="experience.html"> Experience </a><br><br>
  <a href="education.html"> Education </a><br><br> 
  <a href="skills.html"> Skills </a><br><br>

<td width="61%" valign="top">
  <blockquote>
    <p><br>
    <font face="Arial" size="5">Welcome</font></p>
    <p><font size="2" face="Arial"> Aspiring CSS programmer </font></p>
    <img src="me.jpg" alt="US"/>
  </blockquote><br><br>
  <p align="center"><font face="Arial" size="1">© COPYRIGHT 2012 ALL RIGHTS
  RESERVED </font></td>

<table border="0" width="990" bgcolor="#000000" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0">
<tr>
<td width="100%"><font size="1">&nbsp;</font></td>
</tr>
</table>

</body>

</html>
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Mike Brant, scrappedcola, DocMax, KatieK, EdChum Jan 12 '13 at 0:34

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I'd start by getting rid of the table. –  Blender Jan 11 '13 at 23:03
    
There are any number of CSS tutorials out there. Unfortunately, StackOverflow isn't really meant to be a "teach me CSS" type of site, so the question really isn't appropriate for this forum. –  Mike Brant Jan 11 '13 at 23:04
    
I think you need to start with a basic tutorial on CSS (w3.org/Style/Examples/011/firstcss.en.html) and HTML( htmldog.com/guides/htmlbeginner). In crude terms: HTML is the document description. CSS makes the document pretty. –  scrappedcola Jan 11 '13 at 23:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Start from scratch. Building semantic HTML is about focusing only on content, and you will find out that its a lot easier than make the ol'table HTML.

Table-less, semantic HTML

Your new HTML should look like this:

<html>
  <head>
    <title>CSS practice</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="css-file.css" type="text/css">
  </head>

  <body>
    <span>DDDD</span>
    <h1>Personal Portfolio</h1>
    <nav>
      <a href="index.html"> Home </a>
      <a href="about.html"> About Me </a>
      <a href="outreach.html"> Outreach </a>
      <a href="contact.html"> Contact Me </a>
      <a href="experience.html"> Experience </a>
      <a href="education.html"> Education </a>
      <a href="skills.html"> Skills </a>
    </nav>
    <p>Welcome <span>Aspiring CSS programmer</span></p>
    <img src="me.jpg" alt="US"/>
    <span>© COPYRIGHT 2012 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED</span>
  </body>
</html>

See? Just the contents, nothing about styles at all. Much simpler!

So after that you can start moving on CSS with your new separated css-file.css (look the css declaration inside the head tag).

CSS styles

CSS is just about finding paths to your HTML elements, and then styling it. It's really easy.

For example, you could spot and style your title like:

h1 {
  font-family: "Verdana";
  font-weight: bold;
}

... your menu buttons like:

nav a {
  color: blue;
  text-style: italic;
}

nav a means you want to style every a tag living inside a nav tag, leaving unstyled the a ones outside of a nav tag.

Well... and this is a path! Build your paths freely, as long they meet their respective targets (the HTML elements).

Classes and IDs

Every tag in HTML can have both a class and an id attribute. Apply them freely into your HTML tags to help you spot your elements. Use them like this:

<span class="class_name" id="id_name">content</span>

In your CSS, you can refer to a class by putting a dot before the name, like:

nav a.class_name {
  color: blue;
  text-style: italic;
}

So the styles will be applied to every a tag that has the class-name class, living inside a nav tag.

Id's will work the same way, but in CSS you refer to them by placing a hash (#) instead of the dot we used for class.

That's it, you have already begun. :)

I personally would recommend you start from here: How to make websites. And remember... use LOTS of Google. You'll be there in no time.

share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely constructive, it is hard to find a good basic example of this! Thank you for the information. –  DDDD Jan 14 '13 at 15:04
    
Also there are some good tutorials, learn.shayhowe.com/advanced-html-css –  bond Jan 14 '13 at 15:09

css should handle size/position/color/font -- in short, anything that's not structure. w3schools is a good resource.

Use jsfiddle to try out test implementations.

Here's a rough cut, I did with just a few minutes playing around my fiddle

html:

<html>

  <head>
    <title>CSS practice</title>
  </head>

  <body>
    <div class='header'>DDDD</div>
    <div class='subHeader'>Personal Portfolio</div>
    <div class='links'>
      <ul>
        <li><a href="index.html"> Home </a></li>
        <li><a href="about.html"> About Me </a></li>
        <li><a href="outreach.html"> Outreach </a></li>
        <li><a href="contact.html"> Contact Me </a></li>
        <li><a href="experience.html"> Experience </a></li>
        <li><a href="education.html"> Education </a</li>
        <li><a href="skills.html"> Skills </a></li>
      </ul>
    </div>
    <p class='welcome'>Welcome</p>
    <p class='welcome2'>Aspiring CSS programmer</p>
    <img src="me.jpg" alt="US" />
    <div class='copyright'>© COPYRIGHT 2012 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED</div>
  </body>
</html>

css:

:root{
    background-color:white;
    font-family: Arial;
  }
  .header {
    border: 1px;
    width: 990px;
    background-color: #99CCFF;
    text-align: center;
    font-size: 16pt;
    color: #680000;
  }
  .subHeader {
    background-color: black;
    color: white;
    font-weight: bold;
  }
  .links {
    width: 200px;
    background-color: #99CCFF;
    font-size: 12pt;
    padding-left: 20px;
    float:  left;
  }
  .welcome {
    font-size: 15pt;
  }
  .welcome2 {
    font-size:12pt;
  }
  .copyright {
    float: left;
    width: 990px;
    text-align: center;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but... no. w3fools.com I won't downvote you but I'm pretty sure someone will do... –  Andrea Ligios Jan 11 '13 at 23:13
    
@AndreaLigios interesting... It was the best I could find when I was learning it (yeah, that was a long time ago, don't rub it in!); and worked well enough to get me by. What do you use for a css reference? –  Gus Jan 11 '13 at 23:52
    
I discovered that recently thanks to a comment of another SO user... I've always thought that w3schools was official and related to w3c, that is not. Is famous because it is the first result in google searches, but as you can read, it is not so reliable... in the link posted there are some sites suggested, and I'll add webdesignerwall.com/tag/css and csszengarden.com for taking ispiration from the design posted (it's old now, but it was amazing when CSS3 was not yet invented) –  Andrea Ligios Jan 12 '13 at 14:53

The general concept is that CSS replaces ALL of the styling information in HTML, so that HTML should only be there as a "markup" language which only provides data structure to your content.

All of the attributes that refers to color/size/position etc. should be remade as CSS statements, and a class added to those HTML elements instead.

For example, the table tag would change to <table class="mytable">.

share|improve this answer

If I understand your question correctly, you are trying to replace the styles in your HTML with CSS.

This is where you add your css (note that I am giving examples, they might nor be syntactically correct)

<head>
<title>CSS practice</title>
<style>
//Your CSS styles - e.g.:
.body {
attribute1: value1,
attribute2: value2
}

</style>
</head>

And, remove all the style, border, width, etc. attributes inside HTML tags - basically anything that adds any sort of styling, like height, color, font, width, border, etc. would be moved into the CSS code.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! Thank you –  DDDD Jan 14 '13 at 18:15

Basically, you almost don't need any attribute on HTML tags anymore, except for id and class, and sometimes style for inline styling (that is not good but can be handy if you are in trouble and have no time).

Then border, width, background-color, font size and color, etc... are all managed through CSS, plus hundreds of other things.

For basic stuff on unique elements, you can use ID attribute, for elements repeated in the page, use class.

In CSS, refer to IDs with

#myID{ color: red;}

, to class with

.myClass{ color: red; }

and to elements with the element name, like

div { color: red; }

Good luck, have fun :)

share|improve this answer

w3schools as mentioned above is a really good resource. Try to put your css code in a separate "css" file. Also if you just want to see how things interact, developer tools on the browser comes in really handy, if u r on windows/linux using firefox or chrome u can try Ctrl+F12. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry but... no. w3fools.com I won't downvote you but I'm pretty sure someone will do... –  Andrea Ligios Jan 11 '13 at 23:16

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