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Below is the code from the Intercept method on a custom type that implements IInterceptor of the Castle Dynamic Proxy library. This snippet is from an AOP based logging proof-of-concept console app that is posted here.

    public void Intercept(IInvocation invocation)
    {
        if (Log.IsDebugEnabled) Log.Debug(CreateInvocationLogString("Called", invocation));
        try
        {
            invocation.Proceed();
            if (Log.IsDebugEnabled)
                if (invocation.Method.ReturnType != typeof(void))
                    Log.Debug("Returning with: " + invocation.ReturnValue);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            if (Log.IsErrorEnabled) Log.Error(CreateInvocationLogString("ERROR", invocation), ex);
            throw;
        }
    }

This is working as expected on regular method calls, but not when tried with async methods (using the async/await keywords from C# 5.0). And I believe, I understand the reasons behind this as well.

For the async/await to work, the compiler adds the functional body of the method into a state machine behind the scenes and the control will return to the caller, as soon as the first awaitable expression that cannot be completed synchronously, is encountered.

Also, we can interrogate the return type and figure out whether we are dealing with an async method like this:

            if (invocation.Method.ReturnType == typeof(Task) || 
                (invocation.Method.ReturnType.IsGenericType && 
                 invocation.Method.ReturnType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Task<>)))
                Log.Info("Asynchronous method found...");

This works for only those async methods that returns either Task or Task<> and not void but I am fine with that.

What changes have to made within the Intercept method so that the awaiter would return to there rather than the original caller?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Presumably the "problem" is that it's just logging that it's returning a task - and you want the value within that task?

Assuming that's the case, you still have to return the task to the caller, immediately - without waiting for it to complete. If you break that, you're fundamentally messing things up.

However, before you return the task to the caller, you should add a continuation (via Task.ContinueWith) which will log the result (or failure) when the task completes. That will still give the result information, but of course you'll be logging it potentially after some other logging. You may also want to log immediately before returning, leading to a log something like this:

Called FooAsync
Returned from FooAsync with a task
Task from FooAsync completed, with return value 5

The business of getting the result out of the task (if it completed successfully) would have to be done with reflection, which is a bit of a pain - or you could use dynamic typing. (Either way it will be a bit of a performance hit.)

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Thanks Jon, I was definitely looking for ContinueWith. And yes, I want the interceptor to continue logging the return value and any exceptions within. –  Floyd Pink Jan 11 '13 at 23:34

Thanks to Jon's answer, this is what I ended up with:

public void Intercept(IInvocation invocation)
{
    if (Log.IsDebugEnabled) Log.Debug(CreateInvocationLogString("Called", invocation));
    try
    {
        invocation.Proceed();

        if (Log.IsDebugEnabled)
        {
            var returnType = invocation.Method.ReturnType;
            if (returnType != typeof(void))
            {
                var returnValue = invocation.ReturnValue;
                if (returnType == typeof(Task))
                {
                    Log.Debug("Returning with a task.");
                }
                else if (returnType.IsGenericType && returnType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Task<>))
                {
                    Log.Debug("Returning with a generic task.");
                    var task = (Task)returnValue;
                    task.ContinueWith((antecedent) =>
                                          {
                                              var taskDescriptor = CreateInvocationLogString("Task from", invocation);
                                              var result =
                                                  antecedent.GetType()
                                                            .GetProperty("Result")
                                                            .GetValue(antecedent, null);
                                              Log.Debug(taskDescriptor + " returning with: " + result);
                                          });
                }
                else
                {
                    Log.Debug("Returning with: " + returnValue);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        if (Log.IsErrorEnabled) Log.Error(CreateInvocationLogString("ERROR", invocation), ex);
        throw;
    }
}
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3  
Thank you for sharing the implemented solution, it's good to know not just what guidance Jon Skeet gave, but how you took that and applied it. –  m-y May 25 '13 at 1:29
2  
Something interesting to note: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… -- This attribute can be probed to determine if the method is marked async or not, instead of relying on the return type to be a typeof Task or Task<T>... –  m-y May 27 '13 at 11:17
    
Thank you @m-y... That does help :) –  Floyd Pink May 28 '13 at 21:07

My 2 cents:

It has been correctly established that for async methods the purpose of the interceptor would be to "enhance" the task returned by the invocation, via a continuation.

Now, it is precisely this task continuation the one that has to be returned to make the job of the interceptor complete.

So, based on the above discussions and examples, this would work perfectly well for regular methods as well as "raw" async Task methods.

public virtual void Intercept(IInvocation invocation)
{
    try
    {
        invocation.Proceed();
        var task = invocation.ReturnValue as Task;
        if (task != null)
        {
            invocation.ReturnValue = task.ContinueWith(t => {
                if (t.IsFaulted)
                    OnException(invocation, t.Exception);
            });
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        OnException(invocation, ex);
    }
}

public virtual void OnException(IInvocation invocation, Exception exception)
{
    ...
}
  1. But when dealing with asycn Task<T> methods, the above would incorrectly change the type of the task returned by the interception, from Task<T> to regular Task

  2. Notice that we are calling Task.ContinueWith() and not Task<TResult>.ContinueWith(), which is the method we want to call.

This would be the resulting exception when ultimately awaiting the such an interception:

System.InvalidCastException: Unable to cast object of type 'System.Threading.Tasks.ContinuationTaskFromTask' to type 'System.Threading.Tasks.Task`1

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