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Is it possible to have gitlab setup to automatically sync (mirror) a repository hosted at another location?

At the moment, the easiest way I know of doing this involves manually pushing to the two (gitlab and the other) repository, but this is time consuming and error prone.

The greatest problem is that a mirror can resynchronize is two users concurrently push changes to the two different repositories. The best method I can come up with to prevent this issue is to ensure users can only push to one of the repositories.

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This has been requested at: feedback.gitlab.com/forums/176466-general/suggestions/… Go and upvote it. –  Ciro Santilli Oct 21 '14 at 12:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Original answer (January 2013)

If your remote mirror repo is a bare repo, then you can add a post-receive hook to your gitlab-managed repo, and push to your remote repo in it.

#!/bin/bash
git push --mirror slave_user@mirror.host:/path/to/repo.git

As Gitolite (used by Gitlab) mentions:

if you want to install a hook in only a few specific repositories, do it directly on the server.

That would be in:

~git/repositories/yourRepo.get/hook/post-receive

Caveat (Update Ocotober 2014)

Ciro Santilli points out in the comments:

Today (Q4 2014) this will fail because GitLab automatically symlinks github.com/gitlabhq/gitlab-shell/tree/… into every repository it manages.
So if you make this change, every repository you modify will try to push.
Not to mention possible conflicts when upgrading gitlab-shell, and that the current script is a ruby script, not bash (and you should not remove it!).

You could correct this by reading the current directory name and ensuring bijection between that and the remote, but I recommend people to stay far far away from those things

See (and vote for) feeadback "Automatic push to remote mirror repo after push to GitLab Repo".

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1  
What happens in this setup while the remote repo is not available, e.g. due to maintenance or network hickups? I'd guess that either it won't be possible to push to the gitlab repo, or the commits pushed will be missing in the remote repo? –  jfrantzius Mar 7 '14 at 11:36
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@jfrantzius the latter: your commits would still be pushed to your GitLab repo, but wouldn't make it to the slave. –  VonC Mar 7 '14 at 11:44
    
Today this will fail because GitLab automatically symlinks github.com/gitlabhq/gitlab-shell/tree/… into every repository it manages. So if you make this change, every repository you modify will try to push. Not to mention possible conflicts when upgrading gitlab-shell, and that the current script is a ruby script, not bash (and you should not remove it!). You could correct this by reading the current directory name and ensuring bijection between that and the remote, but I recommend people to stay far far away from those things. –  Ciro Santilli Oct 21 '14 at 11:55
    
Another option is to setup a new github remote for each repo. –  Ciro Santilli Oct 21 '14 at 12:04
    
@CiroSantilli good points. I have included those in the answe for more visibility. –  VonC Oct 21 '14 at 12:40

The best option today is to use GitLab CI. It is essentially an already implemented server for the webhooks, which automatically clones for you and let's you run arbitrary shell commands: all you have to do then is to push.

services are a the best option if someone implements them: they live in the source tree, would do a single push, and require no extra deployment overhead.

The key implementation difficulty now is how to store the push credentials safely: likely the best option for GitHub is to get a key somehow (Oauth on UI through the service would be perfect) and store that plaintext.

Another option which has just been added are custom hooks.

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I agree. +1 (I referenced your previous comment in my answer) –  VonC Nov 5 '14 at 9:00

You can use hooks to customize a script that runs after some commit. With that you can send the new changes to another repository. Look for more information about hook in the following page: http://git-scm.com/book/en/Customizing-Git-Git-Hooks

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I also created a project to mirror repositories in GitLab 6 through the API (API mostly used on project creation only).

https://github.com/sag47/gitlab-mirrors

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