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So say I have a website that was built using tables and specifically width tags (Awful I know). According to w3schools that website isn't using HTML5 because the width is no longer supported. My question is would I need to change that code, because it wouldn't be supported by modern day browsers? Or perhaps because it won't be supported later down the road?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by John Conde, ThinkingStiff, Undo, Portland Runner, Chris Mar 3 at 0:48

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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If you specify your doctype correctly as the the one you are using, you should be fine. –  maenu Jan 11 '13 at 23:55

3 Answers 3

That all depends on what browsers you want your site to support. However, as a practical matter most browsers are going to be backward compatible for a while. Most modern browsers still support very early versions of HTML going back to the mid 90's.

That said, it is always a good idea to make sure you are setting the doctype tag on the page appropriately so the browser knows what it is getting and can accommodate it.

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As a general rule I would say no. I haven't read the spec or anything but it sounds like the width tag is being depreciated on tables?

If this site was intended to last 6-7 years without major changes then maybe you might want to futureproof it but it seems rather unlikely that the browser venders will break support any time soon. Too much of the web would be broken.

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There never was a width tag in HTML. For some elements, the width attribute can be used. There is no change in browser support to it; HTML5 drafts require browsers to support legacy attributes even though those drafts declare them as obsolete. W3schools is unreliable and misleading; see w3fools.

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