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I am sorry that this is to long, and it may seem as to much asking for probably something I should let and move on, but If you can figure out what is wrong at a glance let me know.

In this program-I am trying to input some words(phrase) from the keyboard, every time taking one token and assign it to an object #sharedStorer (then print the assigned value to keep track of what is input(ed) as i have a chain of words to input separately) this is done by one thread(Thread of class -Retriever which implements Runnable) and there is another thread-thread of class TokenReader- reading the value of #sharedStorer and print it out. TokenReader waits for Retriever for input and when Retriever tries to input while TokenReader has not yet read the previous token Retriever waits. The question I have is that at the end TokenReader waits like forever-(I mean forever) for Retriever which has completed its task, and so the program never terminates, I tried to figure out what is wrong it is the first time I learn about multithreads I really need to know what I did wrong.

Here is all 4 classes(and 1 Interface) I am using to perform the desired task

    package Multithreads;

    import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
    import java.util.concurrent.Executors;

    public class ExerciseTest {


    public static void main(String[] args) {

        ExecutorService app=Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2);

        Storer st=new SyncStorer();

        System.out.println("Operation performed\t\t Value");
        try{
        app.execute(new Retriever(st));
        app.execute(new TokenReader(st));
        }catch(Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        app.shutdown();
    }

    }

    package Multithreads;

    public interface Storer {

    public void set(String token);
    public String get();
    }

    
    package Multithreads;

    import java.util.NoSuchElementException;
    import java.util.Random;
    import java.util.Scanner;
    import java.util.StringTokenizer;

    public class Retriever implements Runnable {

    private Scanner scanner;
    private String token;
    private String currentToken;
    private Storer sharedStorer;
    private Random rd=new Random();
    public int tokenLength=0;

    public Retriever(Storer st) {

        sharedStorer=st;

    }
    public Retriever() {

    }
    @Override
    public void run() {

        System.out.println("Enter a phrase");
        scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
        token=scanner.nextLine();
        StringTokenizer tokenizer=new StringTokenizer(token);

        while(tokenizer.hasMoreTokens())
        {
            tokenLength++;
            currentToken=tokenizer.nextToken();
            try{

            Thread.sleep(10*rd.nextInt(2000));
            sharedStorer.set(currentToken);

            }catch(NoSuchElementException e){
                e.printStackTrace();

            }catch(InterruptedException e){
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Done Inputting The phrase");

    }

    }


    package Multithreads;

    import java.util.Random;

    public class TokenReader implements Runnable {

    private Random rd=new Random();

    private Storer sharedStorer;
    Retriever rtr=new Retriever();
    private int count=rtr.tokenLength;

    public TokenReader(Storer st) {
        sharedStorer=st;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
    String str="null";
        int i=0;
        try {
            while(i <= count){
            Thread.sleep(15*rd.nextInt(2000));
            str=sharedStorer.get();

            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {

            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        System.out.println("Consumer done reading");
    }


    }


    package Multithreads;

    import java.util.concurrent.locks.Condition;
    import java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock;
    import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

    public class SyncStorer implements Storer {

    private Lock accessLock=new ReentrantLock();

    private Condition canInput = accessLock.newCondition();
    private Condition canRead = accessLock.newCondition();

    private String string="null";
    private boolean isEmpty=false;

    @Override
    public void set(String token) {
        accessLock.lock();
        try
        {
            while(isEmpty){
                System.out.println("Retriever waiting");
                canInput.await();
            }
            string=token;
            isEmpty=true;
            System.out.println("Retriever inputs\t\t "+string);

            canRead.signal();
        }catch(InterruptedException e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }finally{
            accessLock.unlock();
        }

    }

    @Override
    public String get() {

        accessLock.lock();
        try{
            while(!isEmpty)
            {               
                System.out.println("No token to read");
                canRead.await();
            }
            isEmpty=false;
            System.out.println("TokenReader reads\t\t "+string);


            canInput.signal();
        }catch(InterruptedException e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }finally{
            accessLock.unlock();
        }
        return string;
    }

    }

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

The problem that is causing the app to run forever is that this is an infinite loop:

    while(i <= count){
        Thread.sleep(15*rd.nextInt(2000));
        str=sharedStorer.get();

    }

because you are not decrementing i. And the interrupt-based mechanism you are trying to use to break out of the loop (via an exception!) is broken too.

The Thread.sleep(15*rd.nextInt(2000)) line looks like a hack so that you can get an InterruptedException when the task is interrupted, but:

  • the point of sleeping for a random number of milliseconds escapes me, and
  • it would be simpler to just call Thread.interrupted().

Besides, the approach isn't reliable anyway because there is a chance that the interrupt will happen after the point at which you are waiting / testing for it; i.e. in the get() call. And if that get() call is never going to return because the store is empty and the retriever has ended ... then you will wait "for ever".

There is one final problem. You need to call app.shutdownNow() if you want the executor service to interrupt the worker threads ...


If I was trying to implement this (using interrupts), I'd change it so that get and set didn't "gobble up" the interrupt. If they see the interrupt, they should either:

  • allow the InterruptedException to propagate (after relevant cleanup), or
  • set the thread's interrupted flag again in the exception handler.
share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry for being late, I changed and incremented i as you noticed to cause an infinite loop,and later used the approach of Consumer/Producer with ArrayblockingQueue as I found it later in the book I am using, It really shrunk the lines in SyncStorer class but the problem was not there as I realized it later. On what concern getting the Thread to sleep for a random number of milliseconds it helps to ignore exactly when threads are executing. nwy I couldn't get well most about of your answer and as a beginner I don't want to get stuck in advanced stuff I plan to come back later on it.thanks –  Ruru Morlano Jan 16 '13 at 1:11

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