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I'm working on a program that asks the user to pick one of two caves to enter. User may pick either cave 1 or cave 2. That number is compared to the answer (generated by random.randint (1,2)). If the user's choice is equal to the answer, he wins; else, he loses. The issue is that the program never branches to the win condition. No matter what choice user makes, he always loses. I've tried debugging but I cannot see the variable comparison values between caveAnswer and caveChoice.

def gameCore (name):
    print ('You stand before the entrances of two caves.')
    print ('Choose a cave, either cave 1 or cave 2.')
    print ( )


    caveAnswer = random.randint (1,2)
    caveChoice = input ('Enter either 1 or 2. ')


    if caveAnswer == caveChoice:  [# I suspect the problem occurs at this comparison]
        print ('You enter the black mouth of the cave and...')
        time.sleep (1)
        print ( )
        print ('You find a hill of shining gold coins!')
        playAgain (name)

    else:
        print ('You enter the black mouth of the cave and...')
        time.sleep(1)
        print ( ) 
        print ('A wave of yellow-orange fire envelopes you. You\'re toast.')
        playAgain (name)

Thank you for your help.

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closed as too localized by Mitch Wheat, Mark, Tyler Carter, Dharmendra, bipen Jan 12 '13 at 19:20

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3  
Yay. Now, confirm the assumption in the REPL: 1 == "1". So, what could be done to make both sides "of a compatible type"? (See 5.9 Comparisons as well: "Otherwise [if not numbers], objects of different types [..] compare unequal.") –  user166390 Jan 12 '13 at 0:19
    
as a further hint. Try print( (type(caveAnswer), type(caveChoice)) ) –  cmh Jan 12 '13 at 0:23
    
Arg, old link in my previous comment (I blame google "feeling lucky"). Current for 2.x is docs.python.org/2/reference/expressions.html#not-in (this version has nicer formatting and also discusses protocol behavior) –  user166390 Jan 12 '13 at 0:26
    
@pst: It's pretty clear the OP is using 3.x—otherwise, input would have returned the number 1, not the string "1", and he wouldn't have had this problem in the first place. (Also, print ( ) would print "()" instead of a blank line, etc.) So, if you're going to update the link, you probably should give the 3.x version. –  abarnert Jan 12 '13 at 1:18
    
@Fluxcapacitor: A few minor notes. First, you usually don't want to escape apostrophes and quotes like that; you can use, e.g., "A wave of yellow-orange fire envelopes you. You're toast."Second, don't put blank spaces between function names and parentheses, or inside them—doing so with print is likely part of the reason that many of the answerers didn't realize you were using Python 3. –  abarnert Jan 12 '13 at 1:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
caveChoice = int(input ('Enter either 1 or 2. '))

You should also make it so that it'll try again if it's not an int.

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this solved my problem - thanks –  Fluxcapacitor Jan 12 '13 at 0:56

You should convert the input to an int:

caveChoice = int(input('Enter either 1 or 2. '))

But if you don't want the program to crash upon an input of, say, 'foo', then you need a try-except block, itself inside a while loop, so you can try again.

while True:
    try:
        caveChoice = int(input('Enter either 1 or 2. '))
        break
    except ValueError:
        print('Try again.')

Also, you might want to check if the input is actually 1 or 2.

while True:
    try:
        caveChoice = int(input('Enter either 1 or 2. '))
        if caveChoice not in (1, 2):
            raise ValueError
        break
    except ValueError:
        print('Invalid input. Try again.')
share|improve this answer
    
This is the "make it so that it'll try again if it's not an int" I was talking about. –  forivall Jan 12 '13 at 1:09

I tried your program ant it definitely works. To test it, just print out caveAnswer before entering your input caveChoice. If your have an error, then not in this function.

import random,time
def gameCore (name):
    print ('You stand before the entrances of two caves.')
    print ('Choose a cave, either cave 1 or cave 2.')
    print ( )


    caveAnswer = random.randint (1,2)
    print caveAnswer
    caveChoice = input ('Enter either 1 or 2. ')

    if caveAnswer == caveChoice:  
        print 'You enter the black mouth of the cave and - answer=%d - your answer=%d' % (caveAnswer, caveChoice)
        time.sleep (1)
        print ( )
        print 'You find a hill of shining gold coins!'
        # playAgain (name) 

    else:  
        print ('You enter the black mouth of the cave and - answer=%d - your answer=%d')% (caveAnswer, caveChoice)
        time.sleep(1)
        print ( ) 
        print ('A wave of yellow-orange fire envelopes you. You\'re toast.')
        # playAgain (name)

gameCore('Test')
share|improve this answer
    
Yes definitely! I mean just copy paste it and run it two or three times.. –  agim Jan 12 '13 at 0:43
    
I think Python 2 supports int/string comparisons, but Python 3 doesn't. The OP's problem is in Python 3 because print is a function. –  Volatility Jan 12 '13 at 0:47
1  
@Volatility 1 == "1" is false in Python 2.x and Python 3.x –  user166390 Jan 12 '13 at 0:48
    
I've run it 10 times but it never branches to gold coins. I'm stumped. My logic looks solid. There's some rule w/python I'm overlooking. –  Fluxcapacitor Jan 12 '13 at 0:49
2  
Oh yeah, that is right.You guys are mixing up input and raw_input. I don't know why my answer worked though, and his original question didn't work. –  forivall Jan 12 '13 at 1:12

Try converting to int.

caveChoice = input ('Enter either 1 or 2. ')

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1  
This doesn't do what you say. In fact, it's identical to the OP's existing code, so it doesn't really do anything useful. –  abarnert Jan 12 '13 at 1:20

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