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I'm brand new to C, (like started 2 days ago) and I am having compile issues due to syntax but the error messages I am getting from gcc are not helping me much. I compiled as follows: gcc -ansi -Wall -pedantic line.c

The whole thing is a simple introductory exercise fro my 101 class. The values are just tested against each other to make sure they were assigned properly in a line_test.c file. But before I can address that one's compile issues I need to address this file.

Here is my code:

#include "line.h"

struct line2d create_line2d (double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2) {
    struct line2d line;
    line.x1=1;
    line.y1=2;
    line.x2=3;
    line.y2=4;
    return line;
}

and the line.h code:

#ifndef line
#define line

struct line2d {
    double x1;
    double y1;
    double x2;
    double y2;
};

struct line2d create_line2d(double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2);

#endif

and here is the error it throws

line.c: In function ‘create_line2d’:
line.c:5: error: expected expression before ‘.’ token
line.c:6: error: expected expression before ‘.’ token
line.c:7: error: expected expression before ‘.’ token
line.c:8: error: expected expression before ‘.’ token
line.c:9: warning: ‘return’ with no value, in function returning non-void
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4  
And what is line2d's definition? –  fge Jan 12 '13 at 0:44
2  
WorksForMe... please provide more details of your code and compilation process. –  Mankarse Jan 12 '13 at 0:48
    
It looks most like you are editing a different file than you are building - check that your directories match and that everything lines up build-wise, etc. –  Carl Norum Jan 12 '13 at 0:52
    
The directories match. All the files are in the same directory. –  Andrew Jan 12 '13 at 0:53
    
@Mankarse: returning in function a local variable in C which isn't static and no gcc warning? what am I missing? –  Jack Jan 12 '13 at 1:14

2 Answers 2

In the header file you defined line as nothing. In the C file you use it and the preprocessor replaces every instance of the word line with nothing. So basically, you're trying to compile:

struct line2d create_line2d (double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2) {
    struct line2d line;
    .x1=1;
    .y1=2;
    .x2=3;
    .y2=4;
    return ;
}

Obviously, that won't work :)

You should always use some string that won't ever be used anywhere else for the #ifdef guard. Something like LINE__H___ would a better choice.

#ifndef LINE__H___
#define LINE__H___

struct line2d {
    double x1;
    double y1;
    double x2;
    double y2;
};

struct line2d create_line2d(double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2);

#endif//!LINE__H___

In more recent versions of common compilers, you can use #pragma once and avoid the entire name collision issue completely.

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1  
Your answer is correct, but ___LINE__H___ is a very bad choice. Identfiers starting with two underscores or an underscore and a capital letter are reserved for use by the implementation. Use LINE_H or something like that. –  Carl Norum Jan 12 '13 at 0:59
1  
Why -1? This is the correct answer. –  Inisheer Jan 12 '13 at 1:02
1  
Not too many people follow the rules and LINE_H is too plain and might be used as constant. That's why they invented #pragma once :) And it seems recent version of GCC support it (4.6.2+). –  kichik Jan 12 '13 at 1:03
1  
@CarlNorum for a stupid technicality? ...... Come on. –  Inisheer Jan 12 '13 at 1:04
1  
@Carl Norum, because of personal experience. LINE_H is very likely to have the same issue. –  kichik Jan 12 '13 at 1:06

You've done #define line in your header - so the preprocessor replaces line with "" (nothing).

So your C code is:

.x1=1;

Probably the best thing is to make the inclusion protection define something more unique: INCLUDE_GUARD_LINE_H, perhaps. In any case, it should be upper case.

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