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I want to match any variant of "error" (lets assume case-insensitive across the board), which may or may not be followed by a character, and may or may not have an "s".

For example, if it has the following, return the matching line:

text error: more text
text error more text
text errors more text
text errors( more text
text errors: more text
text errors:more text

But if there is an equal sign shortly following, I don't want it to return the line. For example:

text errors= more text

Basically, it's always "errors" when there is an "=" sign following "error" or "errors".

I am failing to come up with more than this:

(?i)errors?[^\=]

Case-insensitive, the characters e, r, r, o, r, and maybe an s, and not followed by a "=" is the way I read that.

1 sample text, more text, errors=123456 more text more text
2 drops=0 link status good errors=0 adapter
3 Error: process failed to start
4 process [ERROR] failed
5 this line might have both ERROR and error=5555 and more text
6 there might be a line that has error=0x02343329 ERROR and more text

I want lines 3, 4, 5, and 6 to be returned, not 1 or 2.

Not having success. Thanks for the help in advance.

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errors? makes whole string errors optional. This is probably why 3-6 are not returned. You would want error(s?) instead. –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 0:58
1  
Also equal sign does need escaping, so you should have = instead of \=. –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:16
2  
@dzieciou "errors? makes whole string errors optional. " <-- WRONG, it only makes the s optional –  fge Jan 12 '13 at 1:20
    
yep, you're right –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:26
    
I'm confused. Should "foo error=abc" match or not? –  ikegami Jan 12 '13 at 18:05
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7 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Zero-width lookahead is a good answer. Try:

 (?i)(?!errors?=)error

where "(?!errors?=)" means "peek ahead to check that it does not match "errors?=".

UPDATED: This is to explain an issue with the original regexp (?i)errors?[^\=] in the question: The complication is how and when "greediness" (man perlre) isn't as greedy as it might be, to quote:

By default, a quantified subpattern is "greedy", that is, it will match as many times as possible (given a particular starting location) while still allowing the rest of the pattern to match.

Note the second part of the sentence. The original expression (?i)errors?[^\=] will match "errors=" (or "errors") because "s?" is allowed to match 0 times to allow "[^=]" to match "s". This is why it matches the 6 numbered lines.

What's happening inside the regex engine when such a match (*,+,? and others) is rejected is called "backtracking", the matching backs up and tries a different path to see if a better match to the whole regexp is possible. Independent subexpression (?>), lookarounds (?=) (?!) and their negative forms, can prevent or limit backtracking, as can using alternation, it seems everyone has a different preference because I think most of them appear here somewhere. Though no-one so far seems to have given the minimal no-backtracking change to your original regexp using the "possessive" ?+ form:

errors?+[^\=]
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This one seems to work without fail. I am seeing much of what I wanted to see. Thanks. –  harperville Jan 12 '13 at 1:38
    
I'm not sure this would allow a line with both error and error=, and return it. I'm really interested in error as long as it's not followed by =, but if error and error= are in the same line, I still want it returned. –  harperville Jan 12 '13 at 1:44
    
@haperville, Have you tried the answer on regex101.com/r/xV2aG6? –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:47
1  
Line 5 match works as expected. Easy way to test is: perl -ne '/(?i)(?!errors?=)error/ && print "MATCH:".$_ ;' then type away... –  mr.spuratic Jan 12 '13 at 1:49
    
@mr.spuratic: Just wanted to understand. (?!errors?=) looks how many characters ahead? In the whole string? –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 2:07
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So many answers, so close all of them. What you want is this: /error(?!s=)/im

You don't need to use the inline groups, use the /i flag instead.

I might have missunderstood your question, I'm not sure. But if you want to disallow error=blah too, simply use /error(?!s?=)/im instead.

Demo+explanation: http://regex101.com/r/oE1eQ9

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+1 for the online demonstration of the result. –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:48
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So you want to match "error" as long as it's not followed by "=" or "s=". It's quite simple:

/error(?!=|s=)/

You could even write it as

/error(?!s?=)/

If you really wanted to match "errors" if possible (in order to set ${^MATCH} or something), the you could use

/error(?![s=])|errors(?!=)/

You're having a problem because /[^=]/ matches "s".

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Try to use lookahead assertions:

(?i)errors?(?!\=)
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How would that change the result if it is all about find a line with a match, not a matching substring? –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:02
    
Split the text by \n, then match every line with the regexp. –  Vladimir Kolesnikov Jan 12 '13 at 1:05
    
I meant there is no difference between (?i)errors?(?!\=) and (?i)errors?[^\=] if you want to return a line with a match. –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:09
    
@dzieciou yes there is, [^\=] consumes a character whereas (?!=) (no need for the backslash) doesn't. –  fge Jan 12 '13 at 1:21
1  
This will not work because of backtracking. –  Lindrian Jan 12 '13 at 1:33
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Try:

(?i)\berror(?!s?=)

Word anchor, followed by error, as long as it is not followed by an optional s then an equal sign.

(?!...) is a negative lookahead, and is also an anchor (like ^ and $) in the sense that it does not consume text (it is a zero-width assertion).

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How about a logical OR?

(?i)error[^s=]|errors[^=]
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The first part of the expression would match a line with error=, which is not what OP wanted. –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:06
    
@dzieciou I think you may have misunderstood what he wrote. For example, look at test cases #5 and #6, which contain the substring 'error='. Note that OP said that #5 and #6 are lines he wants returned. Perhaps you're thinking of 'errors=' (i.e. plural)? –  David Jan 12 '13 at 1:10
    
The question seems confusing, that's why we interpreted it differently. I understood 5th is returned because it contains the string ERROR. Also OP wrote "Case-insensitive, the characters e, r, r, o, r, and maybe an s, and not followed by a "=" is the way I read that." –  dzieciou Jan 12 '13 at 1:14
    
Correct. I think you understood. I don't want error=, unless error is elsewhere, not followed by a = –  harperville Jan 12 '13 at 1:33
    
@harperville Ok - now I'm confused. In your description, you said "I want lines 3, 4, 5, and 6 to be returned". Lines 5 and 6 both contain the substring 'error='. –  David Jan 12 '13 at 1:38
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Oh dear. A lot of people think they know regular expressions!

In your own regex (?i)errors?[^\=] (where, as someone said, the = doesn't need escaping, but it does no harm) [^\=] doesn't quite mean "not followed by an equals sign", it means "followed by a character that's not an equals sign". The two are the same unless error is at the end of a string, so 'error' =~ (?i)errors?[^\=] returns false.

"Not followed by an equals sign" requires the negative look-ahead, so at first sight it looks like you want (?i)errors?(?!=), but if the regex engine finds errors= it will backtrack and try matching without the optional s to see if it can get the whole pattern to match that way, and will then succeed because errors is error not followed by an equals sign.

To fix this you need the no-backtrack construction (?>...) which will not allow backtracking once a match has been found. The regex (?i)(?>errors?)(?!=) does what you need.

Finally, to allow for the rejection of an equals sign "shortly after" error or errors you need some optional white space before it, giving (?i)(?>errors?)(?!\s*=).

This program demonstrates

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<DATA>) {
  chomp;
  printf "%-70s %s\n", $_, /(?i)(?>errors?)(?!\s*=)/ ? 'YES' : 'NO';
}

__DATA__
text error: more text
text error more text
text errors more text
text errors( more text
text errors: more text
text errors:more text
text errors= more tex
text errors = more tex
text error= more tex
text error = more tex
1 sample text, more text, errors=123456 more text more text
2 drops=0 link status good errors=0 adapter
3 Error: process failed to start
4 process [ERROR] failed
5 this line might have both ERROR and error=5555 and more text
6 there might be a line that has error=0x02343329 ERROR and more text

output

text error: more text                                                  YES
text error more text                                                   YES
text errors more text                                                  YES
text errors( more text                                                 YES
text errors: more text                                                 YES
text errors:more text                                                  YES
text errors= more tex                                                  NO
text errors = more tex                                                 NO
text error= more tex                                                   NO
text error = more tex                                                  NO
1 sample text, more text, errors=123456 more text more text            NO
2 drops=0 link status good errors=0 adapter                            NO
3 Error: process failed to start                                       YES
4 process [ERROR] failed                                               YES
5 this line might have both ERROR and error=5555 and more text         YES
6 there might be a line that has error=0x02343329 ERROR and more text  YES
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