Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am pretty new to go and I was playing with this notify package.

At first I had code that looked like this:

func doit(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    notify.Post("my_event", "Hello World!")
    fmt.Fprint(w, "+OK")
}

I wanted to append newline to Hello World! but not in the function doit above, because that would be pretty trivial, but in the handler afterwards like this below:

func handler(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    myEventChan := make(chan interface{})
    notify.Start("my_event", myEventChan)
    data := <-myEventChan
    fmt.Fprint(w, data + "\n")
}

After go run:

$ go run lp.go 
# command-line-arguments
./lp.go:15: invalid operation: data + "\n" (mismatched types interface {} and string)

After a little bit of Googling I found this question on SO.

Then I updated my code to:

func handler(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    myEventChan := make(chan interface{})
    notify.Start("my_event", myEventChan)
    data := <-myEventChan
    s:= data.(string) + "\n"
    fmt.Fprint(w, s)
}

Is this what I was supposed to do? My compiler errors are gone so I guess that's pretty good? Is this efficient? Should you do it differently?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 62 down vote accepted

According to the Go specification:

For an expression x of interface type and a type T, the primary expression x.(T) asserts that x is not nil and that the value stored in x is of type T.

A "type assertion" allows you to declare an interface contains a certain concrete type or that its concrete type satisfies another interface.

In your example, you were asserting data (type interface{}) has the concrete type string. If you are wrong, the program will panic at runtime. You do not need to worry about efficiency, checking just requires testing a pointer value.

If you were unsure if it was a string or not, you could test using the two return syntax.

str, ok := data.(string)

If data is not a string, ok will be false. It is then common to wrap such a statement into an if statement like so:

if str, ok := data.(string); ok {
    /* act on str */
} else {
    /* not string */
}
share|improve this answer
4  
I think this is actually clearer than the official docs on the subject :) –  Rich Churcher Jan 12 '13 at 5:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.