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This question already has an answer here:

I have two remote git repositories. origin and github

I push my branch devel to both repositories.

git push -u origin devel
git push -u github devel

But then, when I do. git push It would only get pushed to github.

Is there anyway I can set up my two remotes, so that I can push changes to both repositories with one command ?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Ciro Santilli 巴拿馬文件 六四事件 法轮功, Andrew C, Raphael Miedl, pixelistik, Prdp Nov 23 '14 at 16:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
See also Pro Git: 9.5 Git Internals - The Refspec - Pushing Refspecs‌​. – user456814 May 23 '14 at 20:20
2  
I did vote to reopen this question. It's is not a duplicate of the one referenced in the close reason. This one asks specifically how to push to multiple repos. While the other question mentions both pull and push, the accepted answer doesn't cover pushing to multiple repos - one could improve it though. – jweyrich Mar 28 '15 at 19:53
4  
My use case specifically needed it to be such that I only push to both repositories, but I only pull from one of them. So if I only had the answer from the question linked, I wouldn't have been able to solve my issue. – yasith Apr 3 '15 at 19:23
up vote 238 down vote accepted

In recent versions of Git you can add multiple pushurls for a given remote. Use the following to add two pushurls to your origin:

git remote set-url --add --push origin git://original/repo.git
git remote set-url --add --push origin git://another/repo.git

So when you push to origin, it will push to both repositories.

UPDATE 1: Git 1.8.0.1 and 1.8.1 (and possibly other versions) seem to have a bug that causes --add to replace the original URL the first time you use it, so you need to re-add the original URL using the same command. Doing git remote -v should reveal the current URLs for each remote.

UPDATE 2: Junio C. Hamano, the Git maintainer, explained it's how it was designed. Doing git remote set-url --add --push <remote_name> <url> adds a pushurl for a given remote, which overrides the default URL for pushes. However, you may add multiple pushurls for a given remote, which then allows you to push to multiple remotes using a single git push. You can verify this behavior below:

$ git clone git://original/repo.git
$ git remote -v
origin  git://original/repo.git (fetch)
origin  git://original/repo.git (push)
$ git config -l | grep '^remote\.'
remote.origin.url=git://original/repo.git
remote.origin.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*

Now, if you want to push to two or more repositories using a single command, you may create a new remote named all (as suggested by @Adam Nelson in comments), or keep using the origin, though the latter name is less descriptive for this purpose. If you still want to use origin, skip the following step, and use origin instead of all in all other steps.

So let's add a new remote called all that we'll reference later when pushing to multiple repositories:

$ git remote add all git://original/repo.git
$ git remote -v
all git://original/repo.git (fetch)               <-- ADDED
all git://original/repo.git (push)                <-- ADDED
origin  git://original/repo.git (fetch)
origin  git://original/repo.git (push)
$ git config -l | grep '^remote\.all'
remote.all.url=git://original/repo.git            <-- ADDED
remote.all.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/all/* <-- ADDED

Then let's add a pushurl to the all remote, pointing to another repository:

$ git remote set-url --add --push all git://another/repo.git
$ git remote -v
all git://original/repo.git (fetch)
all git://another/repo.git (push)                 <-- CHANGED
origin  git://original/repo.git (fetch)
origin  git://original/repo.git (push)
$ git config -l | grep '^remote\.all'
remote.all.url=git://original/repo.git
remote.all.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/all/*
remote.all.pushurl=git://another/repo.git         <-- ADDED

Here git remote -v shows the new pushurl for push, so if you do git push all master, it will push the master branch to git://another/repo.git only. This shows how pushurl overrides the default url (remote.all.url).

Now let's add another pushurl pointing to the original repository:

$ git remote set-url --add --push all git://original/repo.git
$ git remote -v
all git://original/repo.git (fetch)
all git://another/repo.git (push)
all git://original/repo.git (push)                <-- ADDED
origin  git://original/repo.git (fetch)
origin  git://original/repo.git (push)
$ git config -l | grep '^remote\.all'
remote.all.url=git://original/repo.git
remote.all.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/all/*
remote.all.pushurl=git://another/repo.git
remote.all.pushurl=git://original/repo.git        <-- ADDED

You see both pushurls we added are kept. Now a single git push all master will push the master branch to both git://another/repo.git and git://original/repo.git.

share|improve this answer
    
When I do git push origin it only pushes to git://another/repo.git now. Doesn't push to the original origin now. – yasith Jan 12 '13 at 4:18
1  
Looks like it's a bug. Git replaced the original URL, but re-adding the original URL with the same command should make it work. A git remote -v should reveal the actual URLs for all remotes. Let me know if that works, so I can update my answer accordingly. – jweyrich Jan 12 '13 at 4:20
    
Yes, that worked. Thank you for the answer. – yasith Jan 12 '13 at 4:25
3  
It seems like git remote set-url --add --push all git://another/repo.git might be more sane. That way you can still push to upstream and origin but 'all' is a special remote used for both remotes. – Adam Nelson Nov 11 '14 at 12:42
1  
@AJB: It's in fact adding a new pushurl. The thing that confuses us is that by having a pushurl, the default URL is no longer used for pushes - which I sincerely disagree with. – jweyrich Mar 13 '15 at 19:21

To send to both remote with one command, you can create a alias for it:

git config alias.pushall '!git push origin devel && git push github devel'

With this, when you use the command git pushall, it will update both repositories.

share|improve this answer
2  
Is there anyway to make the branch an argument in that command ? – yasith Jan 12 '13 at 4:21
7  
You can pass using bash function: git config alias.pushall '!f() { git push origin $1 && git push github $1; }; f' – William Seiti Mizuta Jan 12 '13 at 4:25
3  
Even though this works, it feels a bit hacky. This seems like the nicer solution. – Matijs Jul 13 '14 at 21:20
    
pros: easier, a bit more portable; cons: does not work with --tags, less scalable (say 4 repos) – Alois Mahdal Feb 10 at 18:19
    
One alias for multiple projects doesn't work well if you push different projects to different places. – cp.engr Feb 19 at 16:15

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