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I have two remote git repositories. origin and github

I push my branch devel to both repositories.

git push -u origin devel
git push -u github devel

But then, when I do. git push It would only get pushed to github.

Is there anyway I can set up my two remotes, so that I can push changes to both repositories with one command ?

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marked as duplicate by Ciro Santilli, Andrew C, ラファエル, pixelistik, NoDisplayName Nov 23 at 16:32

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 53 down vote accepted

In recent versions of Git you can add multiple pushurls for a given remote. Use the following to add two pushurls to your origin:

git remote set-url --add --push origin git://another/repo.git
git remote set-url --add --push origin git://one_more/repo.git

So when you push to origin, it will push to both repositories.

UPDATE 1: Git 1.8.0.1 and 1.8.1 (and possibly other versions) seem to have a bug that causes --add to replace the original URL the first time you use it, so you need to re-add the original URL using the same command. Doing git remote -v should reveal the current URLs for each remote.

UPDATE 2: Junio C. Hamano, the Git maintainer, explained it's how it was designed. Doing git remote set-url --add --push <remote_name> <url> adds a pushurl for a given remote, which overrides the default URL for pushes. However, you may add multiple pushurls for a given remote, which then allows you to push to multiple remotes using a single git push. You can verify this behavior below:

$ git clone git://original/repo.git
$ git remote -v
origin  git://original/repo.git (fetch)
origin  git://original/repo.git (push)
$ git config -l | grep '^remote\.origin'
remote.origin.url=git://original/repo.git
remote.origin.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*

Now let's add a pushurl:

$ git remote set-url --add --push origin git://another/repo.git
$ git remote -v
origin  git://original/repo.git (fetch) <-- **UNCHANGED**
origin  git://another/repo.git (push) <-- **CHANGED**
$ git config -l | grep '^remote\.origin'
remote.origin.url=git://original/repo.git <-- **UNCHANGED**
remote.origin.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
remote.origin.pushurl=git://another/repo.git <-- **ADDED**

Here git remote -v shows the new pushurl for push, so if you do git push, it will push to git://another/repo.git only. This shows how pushurl overrides the default url (remote.origin.url).

Now let's add a new pushurl and check again:

$ git remote set-url --add --push origin git://one_more/repo.git
$ git remote -v
origin  git://original/repo.git (fetch) <-- **UNCHANGED**
origin  git://another/repo.git (push) <-- **UNCHANGED**
origin  git://one_more/repo.git (push) <-- **ADDED**
$ git config -l | grep '^remote\.origin'
remote.origin.url=git://original/repo.git
remote.origin.fetch=+refs/heads/*:refs/remotes/origin/*
remote.origin.pushurl=git://another/repo.git <-- **UNCHANGED**
remote.origin.pushurl=git://one_more/repo.git <-- **ADDED**

You see both pushurls we added are kept. Now a single git push will push to both git://another/repo.git and git://one_more/repo.git.

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When I do git push origin it only pushes to git://another/repo.git now. Doesn't push to the original origin now. –  yasith Jan 12 '13 at 4:18
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Looks like it's a bug. Git replaced the original URL, but re-adding the original URL with the same command should make it work. A git remote -v should reveal the actual URLs for all remotes. Let me know if that works, so I can update my answer accordingly. –  jweyrich Jan 12 '13 at 4:20
    
Yes, that worked. Thank you for the answer. –  yasith Jan 12 '13 at 4:25
    
It seems like git remote set-url --add --push all git://another/repo.git might be more sane. That way you can still push to upstream and origin but 'all' is a special remote used for both remotes. –  Adam Nelson Nov 11 at 12:42

To send to both remote with one command, you can create a alias for it:

git config alias.pushall '!git push origin devel && git push github devel'

With this, when you use the command git pushall, it will update both repositories.

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1  
Is there anyway to make the branch an argument in that command ? –  yasith Jan 12 '13 at 4:21
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You can pass using bash function: git config alias.pushall '!f() { git push origin $1 && git push github $1; }; f' –  William Seiti Mizuta Jan 12 '13 at 4:25
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Even though this works, it feels a bit hacky. This seems like the nicer solution. –  Matijs Jul 13 at 21:20

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