Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do you safely render JSON data in a django webapp?

On the server in django I generate JSON data and then render that JSON data in a django template. The JSON occasionally contains snippets of html. Most of the time, that's fine, however if the </script> tag is inside the JSON data when it is rendered, it destroys the surrounding javascript.

For example...

On the server, in python I'll have this:

template_data = {
    'my_json' : '[{"my_snippet": "<b>Happy HTML</b>"}]'
}
# pass the template data to the django template
return render_to_response('my_template.html', template_data, context_instance = c)

And then in the template:

<script type="text/javascript">
var the_json = {{my_json|safe}};
</script>
... some html ...

The resulting html works fine and looks like this:

<script type="text/javascript">
var the_json = [{"my_snippet": "<b>Happy HTML</b>"}];
</script>
... some html ...

However, you run into problems when, on the server, the JSON looks like this:

template_data = {
    'my_json' : '[{"my_snippet": "Bad HTML</script>"}]'
}
return render_to_response('my_template.html', template_data, context_instance = c)

Now, when it's rendered, you'll get:

<script type="text/javascript">
var the_json = [{"my_snippet": "Bad HTML</script>"}];
</script>
... some html ...

The closing script tag within the JSON code is treated as closing the entire script block. All of your javascript will then break.

One possible solution is to check for </script> when passing the template data to the template, but I feel like there is a better way.

share|improve this question
    
You could serve it as json (via AJAX) or serve it as a javascript file (then include it using a script tag). –  DanielB Jan 12 '13 at 5:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Safely insert the JSON as a string, and then call JSON.parse on it

Use escapejs instead of safe. It is designed for outputting to JavaScript.

var the_json = '{{my_json|escapejs}}';

To get a JavaScript object you then need to call JSON.parse on that string. This is always preferable than dumping a JSON-encoding into your script and evaluating it directly, for security reasons.

A useful filter to get python objects directly to the client that I use is this:

@register.filter
def to_js(value):
    """
    To use a python variable in JS, we call json.dumps to serialize as JSON server-side and reconstruct using
    JSON.parse. The serialized string must be escaped appropriately before dumping into the client-side code.
    """
    # separators is passed to remove whitespace in output
    return mark_safe('JSON.parse("%s")' % escapejs(json.dumps(value, separators=(',', ':'))))

And use it like:

var Settings = {{ js_settings|to_js }};
share|improve this answer
    
If you do that then the_json becomes a string, not a javascript json object. –  speedplane Jan 12 '13 at 5:30
1  
You could do var the_json = JSON.parse({{my_json|escapejs}}) –  DanielB Jan 12 '13 at 5:37
1  
I think you need to quote it, like this: var the_json = JSON.parse('{{my_json|escapejs}}') –  speedplane Jan 12 '13 at 5:38
    
The first line will simply get a string safely into your javascript. You then need to deserialize which is why I've created the filter. You should definitely use JSON.parse rather than hoping it parses as a legal object in any case. –  Andrew Jan 12 '13 at 5:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.