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Can someone please help me to understand this following partial parallel sum algorithm implementation of CUDA-C? I have problem to understand the initial fill up of the shared partialSum array [line 3 to 8]. I have traced it for hours now but I am not getting why should start in the following code should be 2*blockIdx.x*blockDim.x; in stead of blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;?

Host code:

numOutputElements = numInputElements / (BLOCK_SIZE<<1);
 if (numInputElements % (BLOCK_SIZE<<1)) {
     numOutputElements++;
 }
#define BLOCK_SIZE 512
dim3 dimGrid(numOutputElements, 1, 1);
dim3 dimBlock(BLOCK_SIZE, 1, 1);
total<<<dimGrid, dimBlock>>>(deviceInput, deviceOutput, numInputElements);

Kernel code:

1    __global__ void total(float * input, float * output, int len) {
2    
3    __shared__ float partialSum[2*BLOCK_SIZE];
4      
5      unsigned int t = threadIdx.x;
6      unsigned int start = 2*blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;
7      partialSum[t] = input[start + t];
8      partialSum[blockDim.x + t] = input[start + blockDim.x + t];
9     
10    for (unsigned int stride = blockDim.x; stride >=1; stride >>=1)
11      {
12       __syncthreads();
13        
14       if (t < stride)
15         partialSum[t] += partialSum[t + stride];
16      }
17      output[blockIdx.x] = partialSum[0];   
18  }

suppose I have 10 elements to sum and I chose to make blocksize of 4, and 4 thread per block, so there will be 3 block in use, right? [Lets forget about the warp size and things for a while]

When blockIdx.x is 2 (the last block which has 2 elements) then the start is becoming (2*2*4=)16 and it is greater than 10 and it exceeds input length (so both of partialSum[t] and partialSum[blockDim.x + t] will remain unchanged and block2's shared memory will remain empty. ) if so then last 2 element of my array will get lost!!

It makes me think that i am getting blockIdx.x, blockDim.x wrong way. Can some one please correct me? Please!

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1  
Look at lines 7&8. Each thread reads 2 values into shared memory. –  talonmies Jan 12 '13 at 7:36
1  
refer to kernel 4 in Optimizing Parallel Reduction in CUDA to see why there's a 2* –  Eric Jan 12 '13 at 7:40
    
I have edited my question, I think it will help you guys to understand my question! –  sadaf2605 Jan 12 '13 at 10:46
    
When you say 'start', do you mean 'start'? –  Eric Jan 12 '13 at 12:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'd only launch half the blocks and do twice as much work per block. The benefit of doing this is the scratch space required to store partial sums is cut down by half (because you are only launching half the blocks).

The usual way to do reductions (in this case sum), is to do something like this.

1    __global__ void total(float * input, float * output, int len) {
2    
3    __shared__ float partialSum[BLOCK_SIZE];
4      
5     unsigned int t = threadIdx.x;
6     unsigned int start = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x;
7     partialSum[t] = 0;
8     for (int T = start; T < len; T += blockDim.x * gridDim.x) 
9        partialSum[t] += input[T];
10    for (unsigned int stride = blockDim.x/2; stride >=1; stride >>=1)
11      {
12       __syncthreads();
13        
14       if (t < stride)
15         partialSum[t] += partialSum[t + stride];
16      }
17      output[blockIdx.x] = partialSum[0];   
18  }

So if you have len = 1024, and BLOCK_SIZE = 256, you could launch anything <= 4 blocks.

Let us see what happens in the for loop contained in lines 8 & 9 when you launch various number of blocks. Also keep in mind output needs to have the number of elements == number of blocks.

  • Blocks == 4 would mean, blockDim.x * gridDim.x = 256 x 4 = 1024, so it will only iterate once. The number of non coalesced writes to output = 4.
  • Blocks == 2 would mean, blockDim.x * gridDim.x = 256 x 2 = 512, so it will iterate twice. The number of non coalesced writes to output = 2.
  • Blocks == 1 would mean, blockDim.x * gridDim.x = 256 x 1 = 256, so it will iterate 4 times. The number of non coalesced writes to output = 1.

So launching fewer blocks has the benefit of reducing memory foot print and also reducing the global writes. However it comes decreased parallelism.

Ideally,you will need to heuristically find which combination works out best for your algorithm. Or you could use existing libraries that do it for you.

The kernel in question is choosing to launch half the blocks to gain some performance improvement. But using twice as much shared memory may not be required.

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Really thank you for you brief answer. +1 for that! I have edited my question, I'd really be glad if you can look at that! My enquery was about my block2 (3rd block)'s element loss! Because I think start = 2*blockIdx.x*blockDim.x; exceeds the input length since then! –  sadaf2605 Jan 12 '13 at 10:52
    
@sadaf2605 You just launch fewer blocks. In your case, just 2, not 4. You only launch blocks as required. If the host side code is launching 4 blocks, it is being inefficient. Post the host side code and you can see the number of blocks being launched. –  Pavan Yalamanchili Jan 12 '13 at 11:04
    
I have added, my host code bro! –  sadaf2605 Jan 12 '13 at 12:46
    
@sadaf2605 So.. the host code is correct now (you are diving by 2 * BLOCK_SIZE). So you are launching only 2 blocks when len = 10 and have 4 threads per block. There is no problem here. –  Pavan Yalamanchili Jan 12 '13 at 12:58

You may have problem counting the blocks.

Suppose you have 10 elements to sum and you choose to make blocksize of 4, and 4 threads per block, then there will be only TWO block in use.

Since each thread is responsible for TWO elements in the global device mem, according to your kernel code.

The input element read by each thread is shown as follows. I don't see any range checking in your code. So I assume there is enough zeros padding to your 10 elements.

blockIdx.x           : 0 0 0 0  1 1 1 1  2 2 2 2  3 3 3 3
threadIdx.x          : 0 1 2 3  0 1 2 3  0 1 2 3  0 1 2 3
linear thread id     : 0 1 2 3  4 5 6 7  8 9 a b  c d e f

Idx of the element     0 1 2 3  8 9
read by the thread   : 4 5 6 7

So output[0] stores the sum of elmemnt 0~7, output[1] stores the sum of element 8~9. I don't think anything is lost.

Please refer to the kernel 4 in Optimizing Parallel Reduction in CUDA to see the performance concern about why there's a 2*. The slower kernel 3 and the kernel given by @Pavan in his answer are similar implementations in which each thread is responsible for only ONE element.

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