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I'm a newby for Flex and Bison, and I have tried to write a Flex lexical scanner and then a Bison grammar, but I encounter the following problem:

  • a word can sometimes match with different definitions in the Flex definitions, and I would like Bison to find from it's grammar the good Flex definition to choose.

For example, if the word abc can be seen as category1 or category2 in Flex, I would like Bison to choose category1 if it appears without syntax error as category1 in the Bison grammar and incorrect as category2; but if it appears as a syntax error when it is category1 and not as category2, then Flex should classify it as category2.

Is there a way to do this? Or am I totally misunderstanding Flex and Bison?

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I am not sure I understand your question. Bison/Flex help you define a grammar. Anything that meets that definition is free of syntax errors, so your category2 is confusing. Could you please provide more details on what you are trying to do? – Eduardo Jan 12 '13 at 8:30
    
I changed the tagging from flex to gnu-flex, because the former stands for the Apache Flex framework, which clearly is not the topic of this question. – weltraumpirat Jan 12 '13 at 13:34
    
In short: You shouldn't do it that way. Rewrite your grammar instead. – Thomas Padron-McCarthy Jan 12 '13 at 14:35
    
Hi, thank you for answering. Here is an example. In the flex text, there is for example, cat1 "abcd"* and cat2 "abcd"|"efgh". And then in the bison text there is sentence : cat1 cat2. And if I try to parse a text like "abcd abcd", bison tells me the first abcd is cat1 and then that the second one is cat1 too so there is a syntax error. I would want bison to guess that the second abcd is cat2 and that the sentence is correct. (How do we do to add a newline on these damned comments ????) – user1971969 Jan 13 '13 at 15:51

This situation typically arises with what are often called "semi-reserved" words, or what are called "contextual keywords" in C#. In bison/flex, these are a pain to deal with. (Lemon has an undocumented feature where you can define a fallback for a token using the %fallback directive, which is perfect for this use case; you simply make IDENTIFIER the fallback for any contextually reserved token.)

With some work, you might be able to achieve the same effect by defining non-terminals like:

identifier : IDENTIFIER | VAR | ADD | REMOVE | DYNAMIC | GLOBAL | ...
/* VAR is special in a local-variable-type: */
local_variable_type_identifier : IDENTIFIER | ADD | REMOVE | DYNAMIC | GLOBAL | ...

You can probably find the places you need to customize by using identifier throughout and then solving each conflict which includes a reduction to identifier by replacing it with a restricted non-terminal which excludes the semi-reserved words which participate in the conflict.

It's not great, but it's the best approach I know.

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Whouahou. I try and try but I don't get to understand your answer...Sorry. Here is an example of what I'm trying to do : In the flex text, there is for example, cat1 "abcd"* and cat2 "abcd"|"efgh". And then in the bison text there is sentence : cat1 cat2. And if I try to parse a text like "abcd abcd", bison tells me the first abcd is cat1 and then that the second one is cat1 too so there is a syntax error. I would want bison to guess that the second abcd is cat2 and that the sentence is correct. – user1971969 Jan 13 '13 at 18:34
    
@user1971969: Judging from the comment above, your grammar is misdesigned — or, at least, it appears to be context sensitive. Context sensitive grammars are not readily handled by Bison; it is not designed to do that. I think you're going down the wrong road. What I had in mind was a language where you might have rule1: token1 { start-state-1 } category1 { start-state-0; }; and rule2: token2 { start-state-2 } category2 { start-state-0; }; where the scanner returns category1 for "abc" in state 1, and category2 in state 2. This would be just barely manageable; your rule is probably not. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 13 '13 at 19:39

Flex supports 'start states' and 'exclusive start states' which might allow you to achieve the effect you want. If you can tell in advance that the context is such that abc should be category1, then you can tell Flex to start a state in which abc is classified as category1, while in other states, it is classified in category2. Don't forget to switch the state back when you're done with the special state. This sort of technique can be used to make selected keywords into a keyword in some contexts and leave it as an identifier in other contexts. Usually, though, you have the lexical analyzer always classify it the same way (e.g. as token KW_ABC) and let the grammar get on with using that token.

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Thank you for your answer. I'm not sure to get it : how do you indicate start state or exclusive start state in FLEX ? – user1971969 Jan 13 '13 at 18:29
    
Ok, I got it. The use of %s and %x ! I will try this and tell you if I get through. – user1971969 Jan 13 '13 at 19:28
    
Hi again. I tried %s and %x, but it doesn't match my problem, since it's not possible in my case to define correct context only with rexp in flex. I don't know how to do.... – user1971969 Jan 19 '13 at 13:46
    
Hi, Reading the last sentence of your answer : "Usually, though, you have the lexical analyzer always classify it the same way (e.g. as token KW_ABC) and let the grammar get on with using that token.", I wonder what you have in mind : how to deal this situation with the grammar ? – user1971969 Jan 19 '13 at 13:49
    
I wouldn't design the grammar this way. I'd have to understand what you are parsing to know what you are after. With that, I might have some chance of helping. But without an understanding of what you are looking to parse, I can't help more than the vague words already given. You'd need to show some examples of the 'sentences' you want to parse, and an outline of the what the various symbols should represent (should be classified as) in these sentences. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 19 '13 at 15:38

To reiterate Jonathan Leffler's above comment of Jan 13 at 19:39, you are trying to parse a context-sensitive language with context-insensitive parser-generator tools. You need to re-think the grammar or re-think your choice of parser-generator tools -- what you are doing is the equivalent of trying to use a screwdriver to hammer in a nail.

If it were me, I would go back to the books and the Interwebs to review handling of context-sensitive grammar parsing.

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