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I have this code which reads all the files from a directory.

    File textFolder = new File("text_directory");

    File [] texFiles = textFolder.listFiles( new FileFilter() {
           public boolean accept( File file ) {
               return file.getName().endsWith(".txt");
           }
    });

It works great. It fills the array with all the files that end with ".txt" from directory "text_directory".

How can I read the contents of a directory in a similar fashion within a JAR file?

So what I really want to do is, to list all the images inside my JAR file, so I can load them with:

ImageIO.read(this.getClass().getResource("CompanyLogo.png"));

(That one works because the "CompanyLogo" is "hardcoded" but the number of images inside the JAR file could be from 10 to 200 variable length.)

EDIT

So I guess my main problem would be: How to know the name of the JAR file where my main class lives?

Granted I could read it using java.util.Zip.

My Structure is like this:

They are like:

my.jar!/Main.class
my.jar!/Aux.class
my.jar!/Other.class
my.jar!/images/image01.png
my.jar!/images/image02a.png
my.jar!/images/imwge034.png
my.jar!/images/imagAe01q.png
my.jar!/META-INF/manifest 

Right now I'm able to load for instance "images/image01.png" using:

    ImageIO.read(this.getClass().getResource("images/image01.png));

But only because I know the file name, for the rest I have to load them dynamically.

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Just a thought - why not zip/jar images into a separate file and read the entries in it from your class in another jar? –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 15 '09 at 19:50
1  
Because it would need an "extra" step for distribution/installation. :( You know, end users. –  OscarRyz Sep 15 '09 at 19:58
    
Given that you have created the jar, you might as well include the list of files within it rather than attempting any tricks. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 15 '09 at 20:04
    
Well, I might be mistaken but jars can be embedded inside other jars. The one-jar(TM) packaging solution ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-onejar works on this basis. Except, in your case you do not require the ability load classes. –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 15 '09 at 20:11
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8 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted
CodeSource src = MyClass.class.getProtectionDomain().getCodeSource();
if (src != null) {
  URL jar = src.getLocation();
  ZipInputStream zip = new ZipInputStream(jar.openStream());
  while(true) {
    ZipEntry e = zip.getNextEntry();
    if (e == null)
      break;
    String name = e.getName():
    if (name.startsWith("path/to/your/dir/")) {
      /* Do something with this entry. */
      ...
    }
  }
} 
else {
  /* Fail... */
}

Note that in Java 7, you can create a FileSystem from the JAR (zip) file, and then use NIO's directory walking and filtering mechanisms to search through it. This would make it easier to write code that handles JARs and "exploded" directories.

share|improve this answer
    
hey thanks... been looking for a way to do this for a few hours now !! –  Newtopian May 19 '10 at 9:17
4  
Yes this code works if we want to list all entries inside this jar file. But if I just want to list a subdirectory inside the jar, for example, example.jar/dir1/dir2/, how can I directly list all files inside this subdirectory? Or I need to unzip this jar file? I highly appreciate your help ! –  Ensom Hodder Aug 11 '12 at 22:39
    
See also stackoverflow.com/a/5194002/603516 –  Vadzim Aug 24 '12 at 15:38
1  
@Vadzim - I think you mean to link stackoverflow.com/a/5194049/680925. –  Perception Feb 25 '13 at 11:41
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erickson's answer worked perfectly:

Here's the working code.

CodeSource src = MyClass.class.getProtectionDomain().getCodeSource();
List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();

if( src != null ) {
    URL jar = src.getLocation();
    ZipInputStream zip = new ZipInputStream( jar.openStream());
    ZipEntry ze = null;

    while( ( ze = zip.getNextEntry() ) != null ) {
        String entryName = ze.getName();
        if( entryName.startsWith("images") &&  entryName.endsWith(".png") ) {
            list.add( entryName  );
        }
    }

 }
 webimages = list.toArray( new String[ list.size() ] );

And I have just modify my load method from this:

File[] webimages = ... 
BufferedImage image = ImageIO.read(this.getClass().getResource(webimages[nextIndex].getName() ));

To this:

String  [] webimages = ...

BufferedImage image = ImageIO.read(this.getClass().getResource(webimages[nextIndex]));
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So I guess my main problem would be, how to know the name of the jar where my main class lives.

Assuming that your project is packed in a Jar (not necessarily true!), you can use ClassLoader.getResource() or findResource() with the class name (followed by .class) to get the jar that contains a given class. You'll have to parse the jar name from the URL that gets returned (not that tough), which I will leave as an exercise for the reader :-)

Be sure to test for the case where the class is not part of a jar.

share|improve this answer
    
huh - interesting that this would have been down moded without comment... We use the above technique all the time and it works just fine. –  Kevin Day Nov 10 '09 at 19:58
    
An old issue, but to me this seems like a fine hack. Upvoted back to zero :) –  Tuukka Mustonen Sep 15 '10 at 9:02
    
Upvoted, because this is the only solution listed here for the case when a class does not have a CodeSource. –  studro Nov 24 '13 at 3:40
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Some time ago I made a function that gets classess from inside JAR:

public static Class[] getClasses(String packageName) 
throws ClassNotFoundException{
    ArrayList<Class> classes = new ArrayList<Class> ();

    packageName = packageName.replaceAll("\\." , "/");
    File f = new File(jarName);
    if(f.exists()){
        try{
            JarInputStream jarFile = new JarInputStream(
                    new FileInputStream (jarName));
            JarEntry jarEntry;

            while(true) {
                jarEntry=jarFile.getNextJarEntry ();
                if(jarEntry == null){
                    break;
                }
                if((jarEntry.getName ().startsWith (packageName)) &&
                        (jarEntry.getName ().endsWith (".class")) ) {
                    classes.add(Class.forName(jarEntry.getName().
                            replaceAll("/", "\\.").
                            substring(0, jarEntry.getName().length() - 6)));
                }
            }
        }
        catch( Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace ();
        }
        Class[] classesA = new Class[classes.size()];
        classes.toArray(classesA);
        return classesA;
    }else
        return null;
}
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Here's a method I wrote for a "run all JUnits under a package". You should be able to adapt it to your needs.

private static void findClassesInJar(List<String> classFiles, String path) throws IOException {
    final String[] parts = path.split("\\Q.jar\\\\E");
    if (parts.length == 2) {
        String jarFilename = parts[0] + ".jar";
        String relativePath = parts[1].replace(File.separatorChar, '/');
        JarFile jarFile = new JarFile(jarFilename);
        final Enumeration<JarEntry> entries = jarFile.entries();
        while (entries.hasMoreElements()) {
            final JarEntry entry = entries.nextElement();
            final String entryName = entry.getName();
            if (entryName.startsWith(relativePath)) {
                classFiles.add(entryName.replace('/', File.separatorChar));
            }
        }
    }
}

Edit: Ah, in that case, you might want this snippet as well (same use case :) )

private static File findClassesDir(Class<?> clazz) {
    try {
        String path = clazz.getProtectionDomain().getCodeSource().getLocation().getFile();
        final String codeSourcePath = URLDecoder.decode(path, "UTF-8");
        final String thisClassPath = new File(codeSourcePath, clazz.getPackage().getName().repalce('.', File.separatorChar));
    } catch (UnsupportedEncodingException e) {
        throw new AssertionError("impossible", e);
    }
}
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1  
I guess the big problem is to know the jar file name in first place. It is the jar where the Main-Class: lives. –  OscarRyz Sep 15 '09 at 19:41
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A jar file is just a zip file with a structured manifest. You can open the jar file with the usual java zip tools and scan the file contents that way, inflate streams, etc. Then use that in a getResourceAsStream call, and it should be all hunky dory.

EDIT / after clarification

It took me a minute to remember all the bits and pieces and I'm sure there are cleaner ways to do it, but I wanted to see that I wasn't crazy. In my project image.jpg is a file in some part of the main jar file. I get the class loader of the main class (SomeClass is the entry point) and use it to discover the image.jpg resource. Then some stream magic to get it into this ImageInputStream thing and everything is fine.

InputStream inputStream = SomeClass.class.getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("image.jpg");
JPEGImageReaderSpi imageReaderSpi = new JPEGImageReaderSpi();
ImageReader ir = imageReaderSpi.createReaderInstance();
ImageInputStream iis = new MemoryCacheImageInputStream(inputStream);
ir.setInput(iis);
....
ir.read(0); //will hand us a buffered image
share|improve this answer
    
This jar contains the main program and the resources. How do I refer to the self jar? from within the jar file? –  OscarRyz Sep 15 '09 at 19:37
    
To refer to the JAR file, just use "blah.JAR" as the String. You can use new File("blah.JAR") to create a File object that represents the JAR, for example. Just replace "blah.JAR" with the name of your JAR. –  Thomas Owens Sep 15 '09 at 19:39
    
If its the same jar that you are already running out of, the class loader should be able to see stuff inside the jar ... I misunderstood what you were trying to do initially. –  Mikeb Sep 15 '09 at 20:11
1  
Well yes, I already have that, the problem is when I need something like: "...getResourceAsStream("*.jpg"); ... " That is, dynamically, list the files contained. –  OscarRyz Sep 15 '09 at 21:27
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Given an actual JAR file, you can list the contents using JarFile.entries(). You will need to know the location of the JAR file though - you can't just ask the classloader to list everything it could get at.

You should be able to work out the location of the JAR file based on the URL returned from ThisClassName.class.getResource("ThisClassName.class"), but it may be a tiny bit fiddly.

share|improve this answer
    
Reading your answer another question raised. What would yield the call: this.getClass().getResource("/my_directory"); It should return an URL that could in turn be .... used as directory? Nahh... let me try it. –  OscarRyz Sep 15 '09 at 19:40
    
You always know the location of the JAR - it's in ".". As long as the name of the JAR is known to be something, you can use a String constant somewhere. Now, if people go changing the name of the JAR... –  Thomas Owens Sep 15 '09 at 19:41
    
@Thomas: That's assuming you're running the app from the current directory. What's wrong with "java -jar foo/bar/baz.jar"? –  Jon Skeet Sep 15 '09 at 19:46
    
I believe (and would have to verify), that if you had code in your Jar that was new File("baz.jar), the File object would represent your JAR file. –  Thomas Owens Sep 15 '09 at 19:50
    
@Thomas: I don't believe so. I believe it's would be relative to the current working directory of the process. I'd have to check too though :) –  Jon Skeet Sep 15 '09 at 20:20
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