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I have a multiprocess program that fetches web pages that all have different response time. The results are stored in the process queue according to the FIFO rule. I would like to indentify the results from the queue by the process number. This is my test rig and what I have achieved so far using two queues. Any other way? I have tried to use a global list to store the results but the two processes doesn't seem to share the same memory space.

#!/usr/bin/python3.2

import time
from multiprocessing import Process, Queue

def myWait(processNb, wait, resultQueues):
    startedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    time.sleep(wait)
    endedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    resultQueues[processNb].put('Process %s started at %s wait %s ended at %s' % (processNb, startedAt, wait, endedAt))

# queue initialisation
resultQueues = [Queue(), Queue()]

# process creation arg: (process number, sleep time, queue)
proc =  [
    Process(target=myWait, args=(0, 2, resultQueues,)),
    Process(target=myWait, args=(1, 1, resultQueues,))
    ]

# starting processes
for p in proc:
    p.start()

for p in proc:
    p.join()

# print results
print(resultQueues[0].get())
print(resultQueues[1].get())
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • mp.Processs can be given a name parameter, which the target function myWait can then access with mp.current_process().name. So it is not necessary to pass processNb.
  • Keep interprocess communication to a minimum. Instead of passing a formatted string through the queue, just pass the parts of the string that will change in a tuple: (name, wait, startedAt, endedAt).

So, you could do it with one queue like this:

import time
import multiprocessing as mp

def myWait(wait, resultQueue):
    startedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    time.sleep(wait)
    endedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    name = mp.current_process().name
    resultQueue.put(
        (name, wait, startedAt, endedAt))


# queue initialisation
resultQueue = mp.Queue()

# process creation arg: (process number, sleep time, queue)
proc =  [
    mp.Process(target=myWait, name = '0', args=(2, resultQueue,)),
    mp.Process(target=myWait, name = '1', args=(1, resultQueue,))
    ]

# starting processes
for p in proc:
    p.start()

for p in proc:
    p.join()

# print results
for p in proc:
    name, wait, startedAt, endedAt = resultQueue.get()
    print('Process %s started at %s wait %s ended at %s' %
          (name, startedAt, wait, endedAt))
share|improve this answer
    
That is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you. –  ripat Jan 12 '13 at 12:05

No, processes won't share address space at all when you're using multiprocessing - it's not the same as threading where all the processes share memory. That means that anything you want to share between processes has to go through an explicit connection between the processes, such as a Queue.

If what you want is to combine the results of all the processes, you can actually just use a single result queue - they're quite safe to be accessed by multiple processes (and multiple threads) at once. All your workers can then insert their results into that queue and the main process can read them as they come in.

Here's your code above amended to use a single queue:

#!/usr/bin/python3.2

import time
from multiprocessing import Process, Queue

def myWait(processNb, wait, results):
    startedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    time.sleep(wait)
    endedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    results.put('Process %s started at %s wait %s ended at %s' % (processNb, startedAt, wait, endedAt))

# queue initialisation
results = Queue()

# process creation arg: (process number, sleep time, queue)
proc =  [
    Process(target=myWait, args=(0, 2, results,)),
    Process(target=myWait, args=(1, 1, results,))
    ]

# starting processes
for p in proc:
    p.start()

for p in proc:
    p.join()

# print results
print(results.get())
print(results.get())

If you want to identify the process from which each result came without having to read the string, you can easily add it as a 2-tuple. This would change the code as follows (I've only shown the parts which change):

import time
import multiprocessing
import queue

def myWait(processNb, wait, results):
    startedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    time.sleep(wait)
    endedAt = time.strftime("%H:%M:%S", time.localtime())
    results.put((processNb, 'Process %s started at %s wait %s ended at %s' % (processNb, startedAt, wait, endedAt)))

# queue initialisation
results = multiprocessing.Queue()

# process creation arg: (process number, sleep time, queue)
proc =  [
    multiprocessing.Process(target=myWait, args=(0, 2, results,)),
    multiprocessing.Process(target=myWait, args=(1, 1, results,))
    ]

# starting processes
for p in proc:
    p.start()

for p in proc:
    p.join()

# print results
while True:
    try:
        processNb, message = queue.get_nowait()
        print "Process %d sent: %s" % (processNb, message)
    except queue.Empty:
        break

Does that help?

EDIT: As another responder quite rightly points out, it's probably better to pass more structured data than the string, but I was trying to keep my example similar to yours for explanatory purposes. In fact, to make future changes easier then I would use something you can index by name rather than a tuple (so you're not constrained to just adding items to the end).

You could either use your own class, or simply a collections.namedtuple would do the job (the latter is particularly useful if you want to later expand code which already uses tuples to use names instead, allowing for a gradual migration).

Bear in mind that (as far as I'm aware) you can pass anything that can be pickled across a queue.

share|improve this answer
    
It certainly helped. Thank you. I also like unutbu's solution that names the processes that I find - no offense - a bit more elegant. Thanks anyway. –  ripat Jan 12 '13 at 12:04
    
No offense taken, I happen to agree. I'd still suggest using a name-indexed structure rather than a simple tuple for the actual data, but it's not a big deal. Simple structures are fine for examples but Python has rich class support and I find using it makes production code more readable. –  Cartroo Jan 12 '13 at 12:38

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