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I have a small query as below.

I have created a shared library from below code.

help.h

#include<iostream>
#include<signal.h>
#include<unistd.h>

using namespace std;

void killMe(int sig_num);

void printMe(void);

help.cpp

#include<iostream>
#include<signal.h>
#include<unistd.h>

using namespace std;

void killMe(int sig_num)
{
    cout<<"Timeout occurred."<<endl;
    raise(SIGKILL);
}

void printMe()
{
    cout<<"This is help.cpp"<<endl;
}

[root@localhost DL]# nm -n /usr/local/lib/libmyhelp.so | grep " T "
00000584 T _init
00000760 T _Z6killMei
000007ae T _Z7printMev
00000864 T _fini
[root@localhost DL]#

Checking the output of nm, i see that killMe and printMe functions' names have been changed a little. Is there any way to retain the same name in shared library as it is in cpp code? Thanks.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is due to C++ name mangling. To turn it off, declare the functions as extern "C".

help.h:

#include<iostream>
#include<signal.h>
#include<unistd.h>

using namespace std;

extern "C" {

void killMe(int sig_num);

void printMe(void);

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the prompt reply. I did the code changes as suggested but its still not working. :( – tshah06 Jan 12 '13 at 9:28
    
Or, rather, to change to C name mangling, use extern "C". – Pete Becker Jan 12 '13 at 11:42

If you add the extern "C" to the implementations, too, it should work. The help.h file doesn't take part in the compilation process. However, there's a better way: #include "help.h" as first line in the cpp file, which verifies it can be included by itself and that the definitions for the functions declared in the header file match.

Some more notes:

  • You lack include guards.
  • The void to mark an empty parameter list is redundant in C++, though not in C.
  • I'd call the header file help.hpp in order to make clear it's C++.
  • You could also remove the iostream include and then make it compatible to C. You would then have to handle the case that exceptions are thrown from the C++ code, which must not happen for use in C.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks doomster. I understood that help.h wasn't taking part in compilation process as i haven't included it in help.cpp. Doing so got me the required output from nm command. Thanks once again. – tshah06 Jan 12 '13 at 10:21

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