Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to use javascript on a submit button. Upon hitting the submit button, I run a routine that does a remote callback with callback handler h. Basing on the result of h, I'll decide whether or not to proceed with the submit or to preventDefault and stay on the page.

I tried several approaches. First one is to run the submit using jquery after the callback:

$('#submit').on('click', function(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  run_func_with_callback(h);
}

h() {
  if (success) {
    $('#submit').submit();
  }
}

Another one is trying for an infinite loop until a flag is changed by the call back:

callback_flag = 0;

$('#submit').on('click', function(e) {
  run_func_with_callback(h);
  while(callback_flag == 0) {
    setTimeout(function() {}, 1000); // I want some form of sleep function here
  }

  if (callback_flag == -1) {
    e.preventDefault();
  }
}

h() {
  if (success) {
    callback_flag = 1;
  } else {
    callback_flag = -1;
  }
}

However, neither of these solutions work. First one I guess jQuery just doesn't really work that way. Second one the method I did was not a sleep function and does not behave in the way I need.

Any insights are welcomed. Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
The only way is to prevent the event immediately and then trigger it again from within the callback if needed. – Felix Kling Jan 12 '13 at 10:25
    
Your insight is correct - the second method won't work. You need to trigger the submit form the callback. – Jan Dvorak Jan 12 '13 at 10:26
    
Both of you seem to mention that I should trigger the submit from within the callback as in my first method. However, when I attempt it, the page still freezes and nothing happens. Is there something else I should do or is the syntax different? – gtr32x Jan 12 '13 at 10:28
    
The first approach looks good, with one major detail: what is success? I would expect it to be derived from the response, but you don't even declare the response argument to your callback. – Jan Dvorak Jan 12 '13 at 10:28
    
Try the first method, but .submit() the form, not the button. – darma Jan 12 '13 at 10:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sticking with your first approach, would something like this work:

$('#submit').on('click', function(e) {
    if(!success) {
        e.preventDefault();
        run_func_with_callback(h);
    }
    else {
        success = false;
    }
}

h() {
    if (success) {
        $('#submit').click();
    }
}

The important thing is to trigger the click event in the callback and then use the value of success to conditionally execute the submission.

share|improve this answer
    
Works like wonder. Thank you! – gtr32x Jan 12 '13 at 11:42

Can you try this?

$('#submit').on('click', function(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  run_func_with_callback(h);
}

h() {
  if (success) {
    $('#submit').closest("form").submit();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, seems like submit() just does not function for some reason. – gtr32x Jan 12 '13 at 11:43
    
Can you post your HTML code? – ATOzTOA Jan 12 '13 at 11:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.