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So I have a this piece of C code:

void main (void){

int i,n,r,*pt1;
printf("Enter array size:\n");
scanf("%d",&n);
srand(time(NULL));
char niz[n];
pt1=niz;
for (i=0;i<n;i++){
    r=rand() % (15);
    printf("%d\n",r);
    if (r==0)
        break;
   niz[i]=r;
    if (i==n){
        pt1=(char*)realloc(niz,(sizeof(n)*2));
        if (pt1==NULL)
        printf("Jbg");
    }

}

free(pt1);
return 0;

}

Now the point here is when the counter comes to the end in the loop, to double the array size. Is the code with pt1 OK? Also, I'm getting segmentation fault at the end of the printf, and I'm not sure why. Thanks in advance!! :)

EDIT: Thanks to everyone for your answers, this is my revised & functional code:

void dupla(int n){ 

int i,r;
srand(time(NULL));
char * niz=malloc(n);
for (i=0;i<n;i++){
    r=rand() % (15);
    printf("%d\n",r);
        if (r==0)
            break;
niz[i]=r;
        if (i==n){
            niz=(char*)realloc(niz,n*2);
        }
}
if (niz==NULL)
            printf("Jbg");
        else
            printf("It works\n");
            printf("%d",sizeof(niz));
free(niz);
}


void main (void){

int n;
printf("Enter array size:\n");
scanf("%d",&n);
dupla(n);
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Don't cast the result of realloc. –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '13 at 12:43
    
char niz[n]; — this isn't pure C. And if n would be large you'll get troubles. –  Eddy_Em Jan 12 '13 at 12:44
3  
@Eddy_Em it is legal C actually (but remark about keeping it small holds) –  Kos Jan 12 '13 at 12:44
    
But this construction will allocate memory in stack. realloc allocates dynamic memory. –  Eddy_Em Jan 12 '13 at 12:46

4 Answers 4

char* pt1 = malloc(n);
for (i=0; i < n + 1; i++) { // 1 more than the elements for the if.
    r = rand() % (15);
    printf("%d\n",r);
    if (r == 0)
        break;
    pt1[i] = r;
    if (i == n) { // Past end of array.
        n *= 2;
        --i; // So in the next loop i == old n.
        pt1 = (char*)realloc(pt1, n)); // n * sizeof(char)
        if (pt1 == NULL) {
            printf("Jbg");
            break;
        }
    }
}
free(pt1);
share|improve this answer

realloc says for its first parameter

Pointer to a memory block previously allocated with malloc, calloc or realloc, or a null pointer (to allocate a new block).

niz is on the stack so you will have undefined behaviour. You should allocate niz using malloc initially.

share|improve this answer

You must only use realloc on a pointer that was obtained by a call to malloc/calloc/realloc. Your code doesn't do that, so it is broken.

It should probably be like this:

char * niz = malloc(n);

// ...

char * tmp = realloc(niz, n * 2);

if (tmp) { niz = tmp; }
else     { /* flagrant error */ }

// ...

free(niz);
share|improve this answer
    
(In C++, you could write if (char * tmp = std::realloc(nix, n * 2)) { niz = tmp; } and avoid leaking tmp into the ambient scope. Maybe one day C will also allow this syntax.) –  Kerrek SB Jan 12 '13 at 12:49

You can not realloc array allocated in stack. You should've started with allocating it in heap. Also, your initial array is char[] and pt1 is int*, which makes it a bit unclear what your intention is.

share|improve this answer
    
better to say statically allocated and dynamically allocated. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 12 '13 at 12:45
    
@shiplu.mokadd.im, no, stack allocations can often be seen as dynamic. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 12 '13 at 14:25

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